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In Memoriam

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  • Norman David Malbin
    NM

    Norman David Malbin JD ’85 died of heart failure on October 1, 2017, at the age of 68.

    A Portland labor lawyer who served for more than two decades as general counsel for International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 48, Norman was an influential and highly respected figure in the Oregon labor movement. Hundreds of union activists were trained at the annual Oregon Labor Law Conference, which he founded in 1996 and directed until his retirement three years ago. He wrote a pamphlet while still in private practice, explaining wage and hour law in layperson’s language. It is still widely read by workers of all trades who deal with wage theft and other abuses of nonunion contractors.

    Norman inherited a passion for social justice from his parents, both of whom paid a price for their convictions during the McCarthy era. His father, Dr. Morris Malbin, treated workers in Portland’s shipyards during World War II and was instrumental in setting up Kaiser’s pioneering group health insurance plan for union members during and after the war. Dr. Malbin also passed along a passion for sailing to his son, who always joked that he wanted to be a tugboat captain when he grew up.

    Norman studied psychology at the University of Denver, planning to be a child psychologist. He took a series of jobs with nonprofits dealing with youth unemployment and delinquency, but a stint as director of research for the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries sparked an interest in labor law, and he began taking night classes at Lewis & Clark Law School.

    Norman spent three years with two different firms before opening his own office. He served both unions and individual workers without union protection. At IBEW Local 48 Norman provided free legal services at the union hall, where union members could get advice on a wide variety of legal problems. Though he formally retired in 2014, he continued to do work for IBEW. Two of the last projects Norman worked on were union research on job discrimination against women electricians and a grant proposal for FASCETS, a pioneering nonprofit founded by his sister Diane Malbin to educate people about Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and other neurobehavioral conditions.

    Behind Norm’s take-charge personality and booming voice was a caring and sensitive man with a big heart and a wonderful sense of humor. He was skilled at conflict resolution and generous in spirit and deed, extending himself time and again to people needing help. He loved a good argument, not just for the thrill of competition but out of genuine curiosity and confidence that his adversaries had something to teach him. He took pride in the fact that his children were both union members and politically active. He was most in his element sailing the Columbia River and the San Juan Islands, coaching his sons’ soccer teams during their respective middle school years, and gathering with family and friends on the Washougal River. If people were singing, he could be counted on to join in with his deep bass voice.

    Norman is survived by Wendy Temko, his wife of 38 years; sons Ben and Zak; daughter-in-law Nicole; grandchildren Remy and Tessa; two sisters; and a large family of close relationships and deep friendships.

  • JB

    James P. Brown BS, MAT ’77, August 3, 2017, age 75. After graduating from Lewis & Clark, Brown worked as a teacher and musician. Survivors include his wife of 53 years, Diane; sons Paul and Jon; and grandchildren.

  • MV

    Monty Vincent BS ’60, June 12, 2017, age 80. An entrepreneur in the pharmaceutical and medical industries, Vincent worked successfully for 37 years in marketing, management, and product development. He retired in 1998 as president of his own private corporation, Arbor Technologies. Vincent served on the board of directors for a number of nonprofit and for-profit organizations and was also active with the Peace Neighborhood Center in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He had a passion for woodworking and sold his art to support local charities. Survivors include his wife, Julianne; his children, Kimberly, Douglas, and Michael; and seven grandchildren.

  • CV

    Carolyn J. Vesterstein BS ’53, October 17, 2016, age 86. After graduating from Lewis & Clark, Vesterstein attended Emanuel School of Nursing and graduated as an RN, soon landing a job as head nurse with Union Pacific Railroad in Portland. She met her husband, Paul, when he came to her rescue after a skiing accident, and they married in 1957. She was an animal lover as well as a generous supporter of animal charities. Survivors include her husband, Paul; her children, Scott, Kirk, Mark, Lisa, and Karl; and three grandchildren.

  • DS

    Donald E. Stevenson BS ’54, June 4, 2017, age 85. After graduating from Lewis & Clark, Stevenson joined the U.S. Marine Corps as an aviator. He retired as a lieutenant colonel in 1972. He married Marcella in 1957, and from 1959 until 1991, he flew commercially for Delta Airlines. Stevenson also served as a volunteer fireman and worked for a time at the Los Angeles county jail. He loved to read, solve crossword puzzles, and see the world. Survivors include his wife of 60 years; children Patti, Michael, and Barbie; six grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

  • SS

    Selena A. Steinmetz BA ’92, June 23, 2017, age 46. Steinmetz was always interested in travel and foreign culture. After graduation, she joined the Peace Corps, serving as a health care worker in the Dominican Republic. Later, Steinmetz studied American sign language and earned a master’s degree in special education from Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. She worked with deaf and hard-of-hearing children as a teacher and counselor. Survivors include her mother, Janet; her stepfather, Jim; and many other loving family members and friends.

  • RS

    Ralph E. Smith BS ’49, October 2017, age 92.

  • JS

    James L. Shinn ’53, June 8, 2017, age 81. Shinn married Gail McDuffee while in college, and they were together for 60 years. After studying at Lewis & Clark, Shinn became a high school teacher in Beaverton, Oregon. He taught math and participated in activities outside the classroom, all while mentoring many students. After 10 years, he pursued an administrative career, working as director of planning and personnel in Beaverton and later in Fairfax County (Virginia) and Maryland. In retirement, Shinn lived in Beaufort, South Carolina, and worked on restoring a home and reading at elementary schools every week. Survivors include his sons, Paul, John, and Michael; three grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

  • FR

    Francis L.C. Reed BA ’54, June 11, 2017, age 84. Reed was a teacher, speaker, and public official, who dedicated his life to advocating for forests. He worked in Canada and 40 other countries. Survivors include his wife of 67 years and his two children.

  • SP

    Steven M. Pratt BA ’90, July 11, 2017, age 53. Pratt worked as a teacher for 26 years, three of which were spent in China. He also spent four years in Mexico doing mission work. Active in politics, Pratt worked for the Oregon State Senate and on the gubernatorial campaign staff of Barbara Roberts. He loved movies, comedy, and classic rock. Survivors include his two children, Addy and Zeph, as well as many other loving family members and friends.