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In Memoriam

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  • JM

    Jean McDougal BA ’48, August 1, 2017, age 91. After graduating from Lewis & Clark, she married Douglas in 1952. She was an active member of the Lake Grove (Oregon) Presbyterian Church. McDougal loved to travel and took annual trips abroad with a group of friends from Lewis & Clark called the “Free Spirits.” Survivors include her children, Laura and Tom; five grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

  • GP

    Gerald H. Perry ’40, January 15, 2018, age 103. After attending Lewis & Clark, Perry worked as a salesman and apartment manager before being drafted into the U.S. Navy. After returning from military service, he played banjo with the Rose City Banjoliers and the Northwest Banjo Band, traveling all over the world. Survivors include wife Joan; daughters Carolyn and Rosalie; and one grandson.

  • MM

    Mary Anderson Munro BA ’51, September 21, 2017, age 95. After graduating from Lewis & Clark, Munro worked as an elementary school teacher in Portland. In 1955, she married Donald. Together, the couple ran several businesses, including the Birkenfield (Oregon) Country Store and Post Office. She loved taking care of her pets, spending time with her children, and gardening. Survivors include her children, Stan, Stuart, and Ann, and five grandchildren.

  • WB

    William H. Beazley BS ’60, April 22, 2014, age 84. Beazley and his family moved to Seattle in 1966. He worked at Fircrest School in Shoreline, Washington, and also served as a part-time therapist. In his free time, he loved to fish. Survivors include wife Doreen; children Robert and Terri; four granddaughters; and six great-grandchildren.

  • CB

    Curtis D. Bronson MA ’00, November 6, 2015, age 44. Bronson earned a PhD in psychology from the University of New Mexico. After his residency in Bowling Green, Ohio, he practiced in Bloomington, Indiana. Survivors include spouse Adrian and parents William and Donna.

  • RP

    Robert S. Pettingell BA ’62, January 25, 2013, age 72. Pettingell worked for Pacificorp for 31 years. He was an avid musician and spent most of his free time playing. Pettingell founded and directed the Rose City Classic Festival of Jazz, which began in 1991 and ran for five years. Survivors include wife Elaine and daughters Debbie and Lisa.

  • VH

    Virginia S. Heisler ’56, September 5, 2017, age 82. After attending Lewis & Clark, Heisler worked for Sunset Lanes bowling alley as program director for more than 40 years. She married Donald Heisler in 1954. Heisler loved to travel and took part in bowling competitions both at home and away. When she wasn’t competing, she enjoyed sightseeing with her daughters, who often came along. Survivors include her children, Linda and Lisa, and two grandchildren.

  • Norman David Malbin
    NM

    Norman David Malbin JD ’85 died of heart failure on October 1, 2017, at the age of 68.

    A Portland labor lawyer who served for more than two decades as general counsel for International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 48, Norman was an influential and highly respected figure in the Oregon labor movement. Hundreds of union activists were trained at the annual Oregon Labor Law Conference, which he founded in 1996 and directed until his retirement three years ago. He wrote a pamphlet while still in private practice, explaining wage and hour law in layperson’s language. It is still widely read by workers of all trades who deal with wage theft and other abuses of nonunion contractors.

    Norman inherited a passion for social justice from his parents, both of whom paid a price for their convictions during the McCarthy era. His father, Dr. Morris Malbin, treated workers in Portland’s shipyards during World War II and was instrumental in setting up Kaiser’s pioneering group health insurance plan for union members during and after the war. Dr. Malbin also passed along a passion for sailing to his son, who always joked that he wanted to be a tugboat captain when he grew up.

    Norman studied psychology at the University of Denver, planning to be a child psychologist. He took a series of jobs with nonprofits dealing with youth unemployment and delinquency, but a stint as director of research for the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries sparked an interest in labor law, and he began taking night classes at Lewis & Clark Law School.

    Norman spent three years with two different firms before opening his own office. He served both unions and individual workers without union protection. At IBEW Local 48 Norman provided free legal services at the union hall, where union members could get advice on a wide variety of legal problems. Though he formally retired in 2014, he continued to do work for IBEW. Two of the last projects Norman worked on were union research on job discrimination against women electricians and a grant proposal for FASCETS, a pioneering nonprofit founded by his sister Diane Malbin to educate people about Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and other neurobehavioral conditions.

    Behind Norm’s take-charge personality and booming voice was a caring and sensitive man with a big heart and a wonderful sense of humor. He was skilled at conflict resolution and generous in spirit and deed, extending himself time and again to people needing help. He loved a good argument, not just for the thrill of competition but out of genuine curiosity and confidence that his adversaries had something to teach him. He took pride in the fact that his children were both union members and politically active. He was most in his element sailing the Columbia River and the San Juan Islands, coaching his sons’ soccer teams during their respective middle school years, and gathering with family and friends on the Washougal River. If people were singing, he could be counted on to join in with his deep bass voice.

    Norman is survived by Wendy Temko, his wife of 38 years; sons Ben and Zak; daughter-in-law Nicole; grandchildren Remy and Tessa; two sisters; and a large family of close relationships and deep friendships.

  • JA

    Jeffrey E. Arnold BS ’74, July 8, 2016, age 63. Arnold, a physician, had a deep appreciation for art and poetry. He also loved to hunt. Survivors include wife Laurie; daughters Rebecca and Haley; and three grandchildren.

  • NS

    Norman W. Schwinge BS ’51, August 2, 2017, age 89. Schwinge attended Lewis & Clark after serving in the military during World War II. He met his future wife, Joan, at the college, and the couple married in 1952. Schwinge worked for Farmers Insurance, eventually moving to Southern California. When he retired in 1979, he was Farmers’ director of advertising. Norman and Joan bought a hotel and worked together to maintain and improve it. When they could make time to get away, they traveled all over the world. Survivors include his wife of 65 years, Joan; sons Robert, Craig, Mark, and Scott; four grandchildren; and one great-grandson.