School navigation

Featured Events

Civility in Politics Lecture Series

Date: February 28, 2006

The Civility in Politics Lecture Series continues this spring, following four outstanding lectures during the fall semester. The series is presented by Lewis & Clark’s political science department and sponsored in part by a generous grant from the Arkay Foundation. All lectures are free and open to the general public. Parking is available on campus lots for a small fee. This series is coordinated by Robert Eisinger, Associate Professor and Chair, Political Science. For more information, call the Political Science Department at 503-768-7640.

William Julius Wilson
Tuesday, February 28, 6:30 p.m.
The Roots of Racial Tensions in America: The Battle for Control of Urban Neighborhoods.

William Julius Wilson is the Lewis P. and Linda L. Geyser University Professor at Harvard University and Director of the Joblessness and Urban Poverty Research Program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government. He has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the National Academy of Education and the Institute of Medicine. He is also past President of the American Sociological Association, and is a MacArthur Prize Fellow. He was awarded the 1998 National Medal of Science. His books include Power, Racism and Privilege (1973), The Declining Significance of Race (1978), The Truly Disadvantaged (1987), When Work Disappears (1996) and The Bridge over the Racial Divide (1999).


Selena Roberts, sports columnist
New York Times
Tuesday, March 14, 6:30 p.m.
Templeton Student Center, Council Chamber

Prior to joining The Times, Ms. Roberts had served as the Minnesota Vikings beat writer at The Minneapolis Star Tribune since August 1994. There, she wrote daily on the team and also worked on special sports projects during the off-season.

Previously, she was the Orlando Magic beat writer at the Orlando Sentinel from July 1993 to August 1994; N.F.L./Tampa Bay Buccaneers beat writer from July 1992 to July 1993, including coverage of the N.F.L. playoffs and Super Bowl; and motorsports/Volusia County beat writer from August 1991 to July 1992, covering NASCAR and IMSA events, including the Daytona 500 and 24 hours of Sebring. She also covered Bethune-Cookman College, area preps and wrote the metro TV/Radio column.

Born in Live Oak, Fla., on May 15, 1966, Ms. Roberts received a B.A. degree in journalism from Auburn University in 1988. She lives in Westport, Conn.


Saskia Sassen
University of Chicago
The War on Terror as Camouflage for Deeper Transformation
Tuesday, March 21, 6:30 p.m.
Templeton Student Center, Council Chambers

Dr. Sassen is the Ralph Lewis Professor of Sociology at the University of Chicago, and Centennial Visiting Professor at the London School of Economics. She is currently completing her forthcoming book Denationalization: Territory, Authority and Rights in a Global Digital Age based on her five year project on governance and accountability in a global economy. She is co-director of the Economy Section of the Global Chicago Project, a Member of the National Academy of Sciences Panel on Cities, and a Member of the Council of Foreign Relations.





George F. Bishop
Professor of Political Science, University of Cincinnati
Religious Beliefs and Illusions in America
Thursday, April 20, 6:30 p.m.
Templeton Student Center, Council Chamber

Professor Bishop’s work continues to serve as critical reading for public opinion students and scholars. His groundbreaking work includes “Pseudo-opinions on Public Affairs” (Public Opinion Quarterly, 1980, co-authored with Robert W. Oldendick; Alfred J. Tuchfarber; Stephen E. Bennett), and more recently The Illusion of Public Opinion: fact and artifact in American public opinion polls (Rowman and Littlefield, 2005). Dr. Bishop’s recent work evaluates how religion, politics and public opinion intersect in 20th Century American politics.



The Civility in Politics Lecture Series is presented by Lewis & Clark’s political science department, the Office of the President, the Office of the Provost, and the Office of the Dean. It is sponsored in large part by a generous grant from the Arkay Foundation.

All lectures are free and open to the general public.

Parking is available on campus lots for a small fee. For more information, call (503) 768-7640.

Fall 2005 Civility in Politics Lecture Series

Mayor Tom Potter
“Community Visioning and the Future of Portland”
Tuesday, October 18, 2005, 6:30p.m.
Templeton Student Center, Council Chamber

Congressman Dan Rostenkowski
“Partisanship and Camaraderie in American Politics”
Thursday, October 25, 2005, 6:30 p.m.
Templeton Student Center, Council Chamber

Dan Rostenkowski came to Washington as a congressman representing his northwest neighborhood of Chicago in 1959, and didn’t leave until 1994. By the time of his legislative retirement, he had been chairman of the powerful Ways and Means Committee for more than a dozen years. He also served as chairman of the Joint Committee on Taxation. Earlier, as a member of the leadership, he chaired the House Democratic Caucus.

He now heads Danross Associations, a Chicago consulting firm, is a political commentator for Fox television, a senior fellow at Loyola University Chicago, as well as a speaker and college lecturer.

David D. Laitin
James T. Watkins IV and Elise V. Watkins Professor of Political Science, Stanford University
Hard Targets: Evidence on the Tactical Use of Suicide Attacks
Thursday, November 3, 2005, 6:30 p.m.
Templeton Student Center, Council Chamber

Professor Laitin is the author of several books, including Identity in Formation: the Russian-speaking Populations in the Near Abroad(Cornell University Press, 1998), and Language Repertoires and State Construction in Africa (Cambridge University Press, 1992). He has also written numerous articles, including “What is a Language Community” (American Journal of Political Science, 2000), and “Peacekeeping, Nation-building, and the Problem of Weak States” (International Security, 2004, co-authored with James Fearon). His research concerns ethnicity, language and nationalism.

Arlene W. Saxonhouse
Professor of Political Science, University of Michigan
Free Speech and Democracy: A View from Ancient Athens
Thursday, November 10, 2005, 6:30 p.m.
Templeton Student Center, Council Chamber

Professor Saxonhouse’s scholarship includes Fear of Diversity: The Birth of Political Science in Ancient Greek Thought (University of Chicago Press, 1992), and “Democracy, Equality and Eide: A Radical View from Book 8 of Plato’s Republic,” (American Political Science Review, 1998). She is the author of the forthcoming Free Speech and Democracy in Ancient Athens (Cambridge University Press, 2005). Her current explains how ancient political theory contributes to democratic theory, and how gender in Plato’s dialogues casts questions on traditional readings of his political thought.

Share this story on
Download ical event

Featured Events

Contact Us