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Alumni Profile: Ian Alistair Lake B.A. ’13, M.A.T. ’14

June 24, 2014

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Ian Alistair Lake B.A. ’13, M.A.T. ’14

Programs of Study: Biology, middle-level/high school science
Hometown: Colville, Washington

After earning a degree in biology and completing a master of arts in teaching program—both at Lewis & Clark—Ian Lake has just accepted a full-time teaching position. This fall, he’ll start at Sherwood High School in Oregon teaching introductory biology and physical science. With the foundation of scientific knowledge from his biology classes, he hopes to fill his curriculum with creative projects.

Here, Lake reflects on his experiences at Lewis & Clark.

What drew you to attend Lewis & Clark?

When I first set foot on the Lewis & Clark campus, my 18-year-old mind was blown away by the beautiful grounds. I stuck around for a day to explore. I found the vibe of the school calm and welcoming. I had a feeling that this was a place I could stay for a while, and I decided to trust that feeling.

Four years later, Lewis & Clark had grown on me greatly, and after graduating from the College of Arts and Sciences in 2013, I was drawn back in to complete my master’s in teaching at the Graduate School of Education and Counseling. Again, it was the warmth and friendliness of the faculty and the school’s dedication to providing the best education possible that convinced me to come back.

What’s the most memorable moment from your time here?

My first year, my friend Elias Brockman B.A. ’13 invented a game called Wolvetch, which is basically soccer played on all fours with a ball covered in fur. Once, at midnight on the night of a full moon, about 12 of us painted our faces, wrapped our hands in washcloths, and met on a lawn on South Campus to play Wolvetch the way it was supposed to be played. We had a live drum circle nearby for a soundtrack and did a fair share of howling at the moon.

What do you think makes Lewis & Clark special?

Lewis & Clark is indeed a beautiful campus with wonderful facilities set in a scenic location, but a school is only as good as those who inhabit it. The people at Lewis & Clark are the reason it is the best place to get an education. The institution as a whole constantly strives to better itself and reach toward its goals of promoting social justice and progress. As a result, it draws students and faculty who share the same noble goals.

Is there anything else you’d like to say to current or future Lewis & Clark students?

All I can say is Lewis & Clark students are lucky to be where they are. We should all appreciate what a privilege it is to be a part of this institution and enjoy the experience it offers. Soak up the knowledge, expertise, and passion the faculty offer. Make sure you carry on the Lewis & Clark legacy in your own lives and careers.

Caleb Diehl ’16 contributed to this story.

Biology Department Teacher Education