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International Affairs

International Affairs Symposium, April 5 - 7

March 10, 2010

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    48th Annual International Affairs Symposium

Templeton Campus Center

 

2010 IA Symposium Brochure

 

48th Annual International Affairs Symposium:

 Global (Dis)Order: Searching for Solutions in a Changing World

 

General Information

All sessions are free and open to the public. Sessions are held in Templeton Campus Center, Council Chamber, with the exception of the Monday evening session, which will be in Agnes Flanagan Chapel. For the Monday evening session, free advance tickets are required, and there will be no late seating. Lewis & Clark College students, faculty, and staff can pick up complimentary tickets at the Bookstore beginning March 29. Please contact Amy Timmins at 503-768-7630 for additional ticket information. Details are subject to change.

 

Session Information:

 

Monday, April 5, 3 p.m.
Council Chambers, Templeton Student Center

Talk It Out: The Effectiveness of Summit Diplomacy

Institutions of summit diplomacy, such as the G-20, have become increasingly popular and controversial. Their effectiveness and legitimacy is widely debated. These summits aim to bring nations together to talk about global issues and reach multilateral solutions, but some argue that they are ineffective and even damaging to the global structure.

John Kirton is an associate professor of political science at the University of Toronto and director of the G-8 Research Group in Toronto. He served as special projects officer in Canada’s Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, devising a strategy for participation in the G-7. He has also served on numerous international trade advisory committees.

James M. Roberts is a research fellow at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C. He previously served in the U.S. State Department as a foreign service officer in Mexico, Portugal, France, Panama, and Haiti. He also served in the U.S. Navy Reserve, retiring as a lieutenant. Roberts has written extensively on international trade and global economic summits.

 

Monday, April 5, 7:30 p.m.
Agnes Flanagan Chapel – complimentary advance tickets required

Democracy Promotion: Examining Foreign Policy Prescriptions

Western democracies have always faced tension in determining how their democratic values should shape their foreign policy. Many have said that promoting and spreading those values is the surest way to promote peace and stability. Others have maintained that such efforts are often not an effective solution for the problems we face.

Paul Wolfowitz served as deputy defense secretary under George W. Bush. He is currently a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C. He previously served as president of the World Bank and as an ambassador to Indonesia. He has written many articles on international issues ranging from democracy promotion to economic stability.

Merrill McPeak is a retired four star general and former U.S. Air Force Chief of Staff. He served as a pilot in Vietnam. In the air force McPeak served as commander of various flight groups around the world and assisted in the strategic planning for Desert Storm. He has received myriad awards, including the Silver Star for gallantry in action.

For the Monday evening session, free advance tickets are required, and there will be no late seating. Lewis & Clark College students, faculty, and staff can pick up complimentary tickets at the Bookstore beginning March 29. Please contact Amy Timmins at 503-768-7630 for additional ticket information.  Seating priority will be given to Lewis & Clark community and World Affairs Council members.

 

Tuesday, April 6, 3:30 p.m.
Council Chambers, Templeton Student Center

Conflicts Without Borders: Assessing the Threat of Terrorism

How much do nonstate actors contribute to worldwide disorder? Since 9/11, experts have disagreed. Some contend that nonstate actors can compete with states and pose major threats to stability. Others maintain that the state reigns supreme. Can borderless conflicts disrupt the global order, or are they relatively insignificant?

John Mueller is a professor of political science and the John Woody Hayes Chair of National Security Studies at Ohio State University. He was a senior guest researcher at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, Norway, and has held teaching positions worldwide. Mueller has written numerous articles and books on terrorism and national security.

Marisa L. Porges is an international affairs fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, where she focuses on terrorist deradicalization efforts. Recent research includes field work in Yemen, Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, and Indonesia. Porges previously served as a policy advisor for the Departments of Defense and Treasury, and advised General Petraeus’s Central Command Assessment Team on counterterrorism and the Arabian Peninsula.

 

Tuesday, April 6, 7 p.m.
Council Chambers, Templeton Student Center

Weapons of Mass Discussion: The Nuclear Conundrum

Ever since the deployment of atomic weapons at the end of the Second World War, policy makers and private citizens around the world have considered how best to limit the threat posed to humanity by these weapons. Some argue that disarmament is critical, while others suggest the weapons might play a stabilizing role.

Thomas Graham Jr. is chairman of the board at the Lightbridge Corporation, the Cypress Fund for Peace and Security, and Mexico Energy Corporation. He served as a senior diplomat in the negotiation of every major arms control and nonproliferation agreement from 1970 to 1997. He has held several teaching positions and is the author of several books on proliferation and related subjects.

Matthew H. Kroenig is an assistant professor in the Department of Government at Georgetown University and a research affiliate with the Project on Managing the Atom at Harvard University’s Belfair Center. He previously served on the Secretary of Defense’s policy planning staff, where he authored the first government-wide strategy for deterring terrorist networks. He has authored an upcoming book on proliferation.

 

Wednesday, April 7, 3:30 p.m.
Council Chambers, Templeton Student Center

The Balancing Act: The East/West Power Struggle

The recent rise of Asian powers is undeniable. However, scholars disagree on the changing nature of the relationship between East and West. Will the rising states pose an economic and military threat to global establishment? Or will they be peacefully integrated into the world order?

Thomas Wright is Executive Director of Studies at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs and a lecturer at the Harris School for Public Policy at the University of Chicago. Previously, he was senior researcher for the Princeton Project on National Security. His work focuses on soft power in Asia, international order, polarity, and transatlantic relations.

Peter Brookes is a senior fellow for National Security Affairs and Policy Studies at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C. He is currently a congressionally appointed member of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. Brookes served as deputy assistant defense secretary for Asian and Pacific affairs and has worked with the C.I.A., State Department, and United Nations.

 

Wednesday, April 7, 7 p.m.
Council Chambers, Templeton Student Center

 When States Fail: Determining the Appropriate Response

Failed states are often seen as a threat to global stability, providing safe haven to unsavory actors and spreading their own instability beyond their borders. Should the global community intervene to stabilize these broken states, or is it best to work to contain any ill effects?

Justin Logan is associate director of foreign policy studies at the Cato Institute. Logan has spoken on topics ranging from nuclear proliferation to China’s role in the global system. His current research focuses on the formation of U.S. grand strategy and nation building in U.S. foreign policy. Logan has had numerous works on failed states published.

Robert Rotberg is director for the Program on Intrastate Conflict and Conflict Resolution at Harvard Kennedy School and president of the World Peace Foundation in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Rotberg has written many books and articles over the past decades. He is an expert on weak, failing, failed, and rogue states, with a special interest in Africa.

Justin Logan is associate director of foreign policy studies at the Cato
Institute. Logan has spoken on topics ranging from nuclear proliferation
to China’s role in the global system. His current research focuses on
the formation of U.S. grand strategy and nation building in U.S. foreign
policy. Logan has had numerous works on failed states published.
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