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A Landmark Book in Ellison Scholarship

John Callahan, Odell Professor of Humanities, and Adam Bradley B.A. ’96 are earning significant literary acclaim for their work as coeditors of Three Days Before the Shooting: The Unfinished Second Novel by Ralph Ellison, which was released January 26. At his death in 1994, Ralph Ellison left behind roughly 2,000 pages of his unfinished second novel, which he had spent nearly four decades writing. Intended to follow his masterpiece, Invisible Man, this new book gathers together in one volume, for the first time, the various parts of Ellison’s planned opus.

Beyond its richly compelling narratives, Three Days is perhaps most notable for its extraordinary insight into the creative process of one of this country’s greatest writers. In various stages of composition and revision, its typescripts and computer files testify to Ellison’s achievement and struggle with his material from the mid-1950s until his death 40 years later. Three Days Before the Shooting is an essential, fascinating piece of Ralph Ellison’s legacy, and its publication has been greeted as a major event for American arts and letters.

Modern Library, 2010. 1,136 pages. $32.

Faculty and Staff Books

Book-ChristensenTeaching for Joy and Justice

Linda Christensen, director of the Oregon Writing Project at Lewis & Clark’s Graduate School of Education and Counseling, demonstrates how she draws on the reality of students’ lives to teach poetry, essay, narrative, and critical literacy skills in the classroom.

Rethinking Schools, 2009. 287 pages. $20.

 

imageEden Within Eden: Oregon’s Utopian Heritage

Since the establishment of the Aurora Colony in 1856, Oregon has been home to nearly 300 communal experiments. James Kopp, director of Watzek Library, pens the first book to survey the state’s utopian history, from religious and socialist groups of the 19th century to ecologically conscious communities of the 21st century.

Oregon State University, 2009. 384 pages. $19.

 

Onward Christian016 copyOnward Christian Athletes: Turning Ballparks into Pulpits and Players into Preachers

Tom Krattenmaker, associate vice president for public affairs and a regular contributor to USA Today’s “On Religion” commentary page, explores the relationship between Christianity and pro sports and the larger story it reveals about evangelicalism in American public life.

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2009. 288 pages. $16.

 

imageWhen Less Is More: Visualizing Basic Inequalities

Roger Nelsen, professor emeritus of mathematics, coauthors an introduction to basic inequalities in mathematics. The book is motivated and illustrated by drawings that make it possible to see the results in an elegant manner.

The Mathematical Association of America, 2009. 164 pages. $60.

 

imageNew Visions of Nature

James Proctor, professor of environmental studies, coedits this volume, which includes essays about the perceptual and conceptual boundaries between the human and the natural.

Springer, 2009. 285 pages. $170.

 

Alumni Books

Murder, Morality and madne copyMurder, Morality, and Madness: Women Criminals in Early Oregon

Diane Goeres-Gardner CAS ’71, who earned her Basic Administrator license at Lewis & Clark in 1993, sheds light on the often overlooked topic of women criminals in the Old West.

Caxton Press, 2009. 199 pages. $12.

 

imageInvisible China: A Journey Through Ethnic Borderlands

Jacob Rawson B.A. ’05 coauthors an adventure narrative describing a 14,000-mile journey to the farthest reaches of China and his encounter with the minority people who dwell there.

Chicago Review Press, 2009. $18.

 

imageGetting Back to Work: Everything You Need to Bounce Back and Get a Job After a Layoff

Linda Rolie M.A. ’84 offers time-tested tools for finding a new job in today’s tough economy and addresses the psychological challenges people face after being laid off.

McGraw-Hill, 2009. 188 pages. $13.

 

imageThe Culture of the Book in Tibet

Kurtis Schaeffer B.A. ’88, professor of religious studies at the University of Virginia, describes how Tibetan scholars edited and printed works of religion, literature, art, and science, and what this indicates about the interrelation of material and cultural practices.

Columbia University Press, 2009. 264 pages. $45.

 

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