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In Memoriam

1940s

Howard Dietrich J.D. ’40, one of the Oregon State Bar’s oldest members, October 24, 2009, age 99. Born in Spokane, Dietrich earned a degree in accounting from the University of Oregon in 1936. After attending law school at night, Dietrich was admitted to the Oregon State Bar in 1940 and started his law practice representing many eastern Oregon farming and ranching families as well as timber, lumber, plywood, and molding companies. He retired from practicing law at 85, dedicating himself to philanthropic efforts for the Boys & Girls Aid Society, Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon, Oregon Society of Certified Public Accountants Education Foundation, Thomas Tongue III Scholarship Fund, Gantenbein Society at Lewis & Clark Law School, Albertina Kerr Endowment Fund, University of Oregon Accounting School, and Howard and Edna Dietrich Children’s Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation. Survivors include his second wife, Margarette Newhall, as well as three children, nine grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren, and four great-great- grandchildren.

1950s

Kenneth Jack Golden B.S. ’55, July 27, 2010, age 87, in Portland. Golden attended school in Portland, Seaside, and Tillamook, where he started playing violin at a very young age. He joined the U.S. Army in 1943 and spent most of his World War II years playing bass fiddle to entertain troops. He played bass in the Portland (now Oregon) Symphony and led the Ken Golden Orchestra. In 1946, Golden and his brother, Dan, started American Music Company in downtown Vancouver. In 1952, he married Diana Galante. In 1982, Golden closed the music store and retired. Active in the Sertoma Club, an organization dedicated to issues of hearing health, he was once elected Sertoman of the Year. Ken and Diana loved to travel, and Ken loved to play golf. Survivors include his wife, two daughters, and two grandsons.

Calvin C.J. “Speed” Anderson CAS ’56, August 13, 2010, age 76, after a second bout of colon cancer. For more than 60 years, Anderson was a musician and entertainer in the Portland area. He loved to play the piano, sing, and foster laughter. Born in California, he eventually moved with his family to Langlois on the Oregon Coast. While a student at Lewis & Clark, he met Bill Trevor B.S. ’54, a returning World War II veteran and drummer. After playing with him in a trio, they formed their own group called The Envoys. In the early 1960s, Anderson and Trevor had a live music show called Happy Time, first on television station KATU and then on KOIN. As a solo performer, Anderson played in Portland, Gearhart, and Long Beach. Survivors include his wife, Rosemary; four children; three stepchildren; and nine grandchildren.

Joseph St. Martin J.D. ’57, January 15, 2010, age 82, in Waldport. St. Martin was born in Carson, Washington, to one of the region’s oldest French and Native American families. He graduated from the University of Oregon and to his last breath remained a Ducks fan. St. Martin maintained a private law practice for 12 years before his appointment as a hearings officer for the Oregon Workers’ Compensation Board. He later became an administrative law judge, remaining active on legal boards and in associations until 1996, well past his 1989 retirement. Survivors include his wife, the former Helen Brooks, whom he wed in 1954; one son; five daughters; twenty grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Norm Lindstedt J.D. ’58, December 13, 2009, age 78. Born in Portland, Lindstedt graduated from the University of Oregon in 1953. He married Merrinell Merrigan in 1951. Lindstedt had his own law firm and practiced law for 50 years as a trial attorney, judge pro tem (Multnomah County Circuit Court), and arbitrator. Survivors include his wife, two sons, four daughters, ten grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and two brothers.

Jack Booch B.A. ’59, February 11, 2010, of cancer. During the 1980s, Booch was a former executive producer and director for the Theatre Guild of New York. In the late 1960s, he served as director of the Portland Civic Theatre Guild.

1960s

William “Bill” Scalf J.D. ’67, January 9, 2010, age 70, during his third battle with cancer. Scalf worked his way through law school as a road deputy for the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office. He practiced law in east Multnomah County for 43 years, heading up the Scalf & O’Halloran law firm for 31 years and working with the same law partners and legal assistant for over 30 years. His practice emphasized criminal defense, personal injury, and business law. Scalf was a long-time member of the Oregon Criminal Defense Lawyers Association and the Oregon Trial Lawyers Association. His clients usually became his friends; they treasured his compassion, wisdom, and sense of humor. Colleagues described him as the ultimate defense attorney, fighting for his clients with passion and skill. Survivors include his second wife, Carol Ann Scalf, one son, two stepchildren, and four grandchildren, as well as his faithful yellow lab, Mack the Wonder Dog, and his professional family.

1970s

Paul Boland J.D. ’71, January 3, 2010, age 68. Born in Philadelphia, Boland served as a U.S. Air Force captain and practiced law in Portland. Survivors include two daughters and a son.

Stephen Alm J.D. ’74, November 11, 2009, age 59. A graduate of Macalester College, Alm was a brain-injury survivor and a creative and gifted artist. His Christian faith, family, and friendships were central to his life. Survivors include a sister, a brother, a niece, and two nephews.

Dennis Sarriugarte J.D. ’76, September 25, 2009, age 69. After graduation, Sarriugarte set up his law office in Salem, where he practiced until his death. He had great passion for law and for his clients, viewing his practice as a means to give back to others. He focused on family law and served as a mediator. He spent the last 21 years of his life as a grateful and sober member of Alcoholics Anonymous, quietly and humbly helping many alcoholics to achieve long-term sobriety and live useful and productive lives. Survivors include his wife, Ana, as well as children, grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.

1980s

Kaaren Plant J.D. ’82, December 13, 2009, age 64. She had a private practice in downtown Chicago and was on the panel of attorneys called upon to represent federal criminal defendants in U.S. District Court and also children and adults in Cook County Juvenile Court. As a board member with Growing Home, a Chicago-based organization supporting urban organic farming, Plant led fund-raising efforts and handled legal issues. Survivors include her son, a sister, and two granddaughters.

Danny Gerlt J.D. ’85, March 31, age 61, of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease. Gerlt was born in Dorris, California, and grew up in Roseburg. He graduated from Oregon State University with a B.S. in mechanical engineering; on his commencement day, he was commissioned as an ensign in the U.S. Navy. Over his lifetime, Gerlt was a nuclear submarine officer, mechanical engineer, consumer-rights attorney, and amateur concrete mason. He was a sole practitioner in Portland and loved it. Last September, he was admitted to the U.S. Supreme Court but was unable to argue his consumer law case due to illness. Survivors include his wife, Teri Gerlt, as well as children and grandchildren.

Lisbet Alicia Engelsted B.S. ’87, March 31, age 45, unexpectedly. Born in Worcester, Massachusetts, Engelsted was a graduate of Philips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. She was an excellent sailor, a skilled equestrian specializing in dressage, and an avid reader and linguist, fluent in Danish, Spanish, German, and English. Engelsted was a licensed massage therapist in Alabama and Florida as well as an accomplished athlete and triathlete, placing often in her age group in area races. During Easter season 2010, Engelsted became a communicant at St. Ann Catholic Church in Naples, Florida, where she was active in Bible study and religious education. Along with her family, her loves included her religion, biking, swimming, running, gardening, reading, and world travels. Survivors include her children, John, 16, Grace, 14, and Ellen Rose, 5; four sisters; and one brother.

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