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    May 27
    The reports arrived from Hungary in a dusty envelope topped with colorful stamps. Inside, each document was labeled “Top Secret” and imprinted with the green watermark of the National Archives in Budapest.
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    February 13
    By Barbara Allen Burke B.A. ’83, M.A. ’87
    I first came to Oregon way back in the fall of 1979. I was about to start school at Lewis & Clark, and my parents drove me on the 1,300-mile trip from Colorado.
       I sat in the backseat along with my navy blue metal locker, a large-ish suitcase, and my electric typewriter. I was dreaming about moving into my dorm room, worried about whether my roommates would like me, and trying to fathom what college life would be like. I was pretty quiet on the trip, as I remember.
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    January 28
    Three years ago, every time I heard the word “commencement,” it reminded me of the uncertainty ahead. A few days before graduating with an econ degree in 2001, I expressed my career and life concerns to my mother. She replied, “Try to relax. Your father and I have never been able to accurately predict what would be happening in our lives two years down the road, and we’re 50 years old!”
  • December 12
    by Micah Risher B.A. ‘01
    Bamyan, a mere 30-minute flight from Kabul, seems worlds apart from the car-choked streets of Afghanistan’s capital city. The Hindu Kush mountains quickly dominate the view from my tiny airplane window, while the dusty valley of Kabul shrinks away into the horizon. 
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    October 22
    By Julia Huggins B.A. ’13
    I’m going to be upfront with you: academically, I’m a little all over the place. But I see that as an advantage rather than a problem. You see, I get a kick out of understanding the world. And, it turns out, the world involves a lot more than one subject.
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    May 29
    By Joanne Mulcahy
    In a widely viewed TED talk, Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Adichie describes her encounters with “the danger of a single story.” Adichie grew up in a middle-class family, and her mother repeatedly commanded that she finish her dinner, citing the poverty of their houseboy, Fide. When she finally met Fide’s family, she was astonished that his mother wove beautiful raffia baskets. In her mother’s single story of poverty, there was no room for beauty. Single stories reduce the complexity of human experience. People become, Adichie argues, one aspect of their lives.
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    February 13
    By Anna Brones B.A. ’06
    I was getting yet another opinion on my decision to travel to Afghanistan. The statement was said out of love, in an effort to remind me that I should be aware of my surroundings and behavior. Just because I was a strong, independent woman, I should be sure to remember to respect local culture. But it was also coming from someone who had never traveled to Afghanistan.
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    October 7
    Alaina Green CAS ’13 is double majoring in physics and math. She works in the Math Skills Center and helps organize Physics Club activities. Off campus, she serves as a volunteer mentor in robotics for middle and high school students.
  • June 5
    Crossword Solution
  • June 5
    by Parker Lewis B.A. ‘08
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    January 21
    When writing her poem “All Times and All Tenses Alive in This Moment,” Mary Szybist, associate professor of English, says she was “thinking about faith and doubt and how the two can be entwined and even, perhaps, simultaneous. I wanted each line to read as a declaration and as an open question.”
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    September 19
    by Rishona Zimring, Associate Professor of English A few months ago, a quantity of time reached out and grabbed the American consciousness by the throat. “Four hours” loomed large in the anxious minds of millions. A mild panic swept the nation. “Four hours”: too long. What do we do for hours, for hours and hours, for hours on end?
  • May 31
    As Lewis & Clark students wind up their final exams for the academic year, we decided to test readers on their command of campus trivia. Sharpen your No. 2 pencil and find out how much you really know about Lewis & Clark.
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    January 18
    By Matt Love M.A.T. ’88 (Adapted from Gimme Refuge: The Education of a Caretaker, Nestucca Spit Press, 2010)
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    September 8
    As a black woman, I am moved beyond language to be here when we honor those without names or status, people who made a difference in large and small ways.
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    April 28
    Lisa LeSage’s story of the 8.8-magnitude earthquake that struck the coast of central Chile on Feburary 27, 2010.
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    February 5
    As told by Roger Fernandes (Lower Elwha Band of the S’Klallam Indians

    In a time before this time, the animals had a big problem. It was a terrible problem that affected each and every one of them, and they could not figure out how to solve it. They were perplexed.
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    September 25
    I am based in Gaborone, Botswana. Even though Gaborone is the capital city, it feels like a town in this country of only 1.7 million people. Speeding along its busy roads, I see herds of goats waiting to cross at traffic signals and cows grazing on sparse patches of grass.
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    April 28
    Winter turned out to be a season of bounty for Mary Szybist, assistant professor of English.
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    February 5
    In August Ryan McKinstry (B.A. ‘07) found himself, with fellow L&C graduate Avery Schmidt (B.A. ‘07), in the most surreal of circumstances when the small democratic nation of Georgia became embroiled in a conventional war against one of the most powerful armies on earth.
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    August 6
    Last fall, I visited Haiti for one week–long enough to learn that this island nation, only 700 miles from the tip of Florida, is much more than its poverty.
  • October 1
    Will Pritchard, assistant professor of English, specializes in 17th- and 18th-century British literature. His book,  Outward Appearances: The Female Exterior in Restoration London, will be published by Bucknell University Press in 2008. This poem appeared in the 2006-07 edition of the Lewis & Clark Literary Review.
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    August 11
    Early one morning last year, when the streets of downtown Los Angeles were still mostly deserted, a strange figure appeared in the Goodwill store at 235 South Broadway, next door to the Guadalupe Wedding Chapel. She had on tennis shoes, dungarees, and a faded blue T-shirt, and was outfitted as if for a safari or a spelunking expedition. A khaki vest was stuffed with empty plastic vials; a black duffel bag across her shoulders held a pair of high-tech headlamps, a digital camera, and a venom extractor. She made her way to the front desk, past a rack of summer dresses on sale for six dollars and ninety-nine cents. Then she introduced herself to the store manager, Gina Torres, a statuesque woman with silver blond hair and thickly drawn eyeliner. She said that her name was Greta Binford and she wanted to hunt spiders in the basement.
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    March 11
    Ian Frazier, author and essayist for the New Yorker magazine, was the keynote speaker for the fourth and final Lewis & Clark College symposium commemorating the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. The theme of the symposium, held September 29–30, 2006, was Legacies. In these edited excerpts from his talk, Frazier muses on some of the legacies of the Corps of Discovery.
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    August 11
    Less than a week after Katrina made landfall, I was observing the one-year anniversary of my husband’s death. Jura died outside, under a big sky, doing what he loved: hiking.
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    March 11
    by Marti Arnold Alston ’69
    I remember the Lewis & Clark campus of the late 1960s as a collection of terracotta brick, grayish stone, and brownish wood buildings, all of which were nestled in acres of seemingly endless green.
  • December 12
    One of my lifelong commitments as a teacher and scholar has been that of exploring the role of imagination and narrative in the course of moral and ethical development. I have long viewed teaching and learning as acts of discovery, portraiture, and inquiry: discovery of new ways of seeing and thinking;portraiture of persons, time, and place across many contexts and cultures; and open and fearless inquiry into problems and possibilities that might take a different turn than others have tried.
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    June 13
    About 45 years ago in Calcutta, my father taught part time at five different colleges to earn enough money for a one-way ticket to San Francisco. He wanted to go to the University of California at Berkeley to earn his Ph.D.
  • December 13
    In October, Lewis & Clark College became the first and only campus in the United States to comply with greenhouse gas emissions targets outlined in the Kyoto Protocol.

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