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    by Genevieve J. Long
    Nicolle Rager Fuller B.S. ’99 combines her interests in science and art to give readers a new perspective on Darwin’s On the Origin of Species.
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    Mary Szybist, associate professor of English, has made the long list for the 2013 National Book Award in Poetry with her latest collection, Incarnadine.
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    Pauls Toutonghi, associate professor of English, will dig and delve into everything—cultures, food, slang, even copper—to find the core of a story. Then he’ll dig again.
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    When Barack Obama made his first presidential visit to Israel this spring, there was much talk of what his trip would mean for the stalled Israeli-Palestinian peace process. “I am hopeful,” the president told an audience of mostly college-age Israelis, “that we can draw upon what’s best in ourselves to win the battles for peace in the wake of so much war.” The crowd rose to a standing ovation.
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    After four decades, Rocky Blumhagen returned to the Lewis & Clark stage in June. Partnering with Susannah Mars and the Portland Chamber Orchestra, under the direction of Maestro Yaki Bergman, he performed his latest fundraising revue, “Oh, Those Gershwin Boys!”
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    Two years ago, when students ventured outside Sierra High School in Fillmore, California, they encountered little more than piles of rock and bare dirt. Today, they are greeted with a variety of California native plants, including hummingbird sage, California poppies, manzanita, elderberry, yarrow, and deer grass—plus an array of local wildlife that have made this revived habitat their home.
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    A week’s sail from land, Kim McCoy was aboard a ship owned by the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society. The weather worsened, tossing the vessel around like a rag doll while the captain struggled to steer clear of treacherous ice chunks called “growlers” in the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary off the coast of Antarctica.
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    In the fall of 1962, senior Myrna Ann Adkins B.A. ’63 climbed aboard the S.S. President Cleveland docked in San Francisco. Filled with anticipation, and a bit of trepidation, she and about 20 Lewis & Clark students were heading to Japan for a semester of cultural immersion and study. Their voyage was one of five inaugural overseas study programs offered by the college.
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    When Christy Hale’s B.A. ’77, M.A.T. ’80 daughter was a baby, she remembers watching her make brightly colored pyramids out of stacking rings. “Turned upside down, the stack of rings resembled Frank Lloyd Wright’s design for the Guggenheim Museum in New York City,” thought Hale.
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    Greg Scholl J.D. ’95 headed home from his day job at the Metropolitan Public Defender’s Office in Hillsboro, Oregon, to grab his trombone and don a black tuxedo, bow tie, and cummerbund. He hustled over to a local church and joined the Portland Columbia Symphony Orchestra on stage. Then, for the next two hours, he exchanged legal briefs for sheet music, leading the low brass section through performances of Dvorak’s Symphony No. 2 and Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue.
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    On a summer day in 2007, Bjorn Hinrichs B.A. ’94 and his 3-year-old son, Sawyer, were exploring the front yard of their Lake Oswego, Oregon, home—digging in the dirt, turning over rocks, and inspecting bugs. A noisy bird with a red head and fluffy red chest flew in and landed. Sawyer was captivated—and curious.
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    Crowds roar and cheer as celebrities walk the red carpet outside Dolby Theatre in Hollywood. Cameras click staccato style and flashbulbs dazzle as reporters wrangle movie stars for live interviews at the annual Academy Awards ceremony.
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    On a warm summer night in Oklahoma, members of the Seminole Nation gathered for a celebratory stomp dance. Men wore blue jeans and baseball or cowboy hats adorned with eagle, hawk, and crane feathers. A tribal elder began to sing, and the other men chanted the chorus in their native tongue. Women, dressed in skirts and blouses designed with Seminole patchwork, kept the rhythm with shell shakers fastened to their legs.
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    Heidi Heitkamp J.D. ’80 is the first woman elected to represent North Dakota in either the U.S. Senate or House.
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    Tim Swinehart, a social studies teacher at Lincoln High School in Portland, was disturbed by the monster storm. But as part of a growing movement of educators committed to environmental justice, he turned the weather event into a lesson about climate literacy.
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    Kim Stafford writes a compassionate memoir exploring the life—and suicide—of his brother, Bret.
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    On September 14, 1962, a Lewis & Clark professor and 23 students—along with a representative from the Experiment in International Living—boarded a bus heading for a four-month overseas study program in Mexico. 
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    Matt Wuerker B.A. ’79 won the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning in recognition of “his consistently fresh, funny cartoons, especially memorable for lampooning the partisan conflict that engulfs Washington.”
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    While a student at St. Mary’s Academy, a high school for girls in Portland, Maureen Daschel used to sit with rapt attention as Sister Rosemary Ann Parker loaded filmstrips into the projector. Barely able to contain her enthusiasm, Daschel concentrated on images of what was then cutting-edge science, cast on a pull-down screen.
  • Amy Clay Ives B.A. ’01 joined teammates rowing for Australia in the women’s quadruple sculls. Her team finished fourth in the finals, just behind Ukraine, Germany, and the United States.
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    Under the stone arches of Sant’Eufemia, a 12th-century church in Spoleto, Italy, Grant Herreid took up his lute. His fingers moved deftly across the strings, plucking a melody line that may have been familiar to the church’s first parishioners.
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    Strolling through the streets and gardens of Tokyo, Chico Hayasaki stops to notice the silhouettes of flowering trees and a pink-orange cloud floating above the setting sun.
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    It’s lunchtime in Portland’s central east-side industrial district. Enticed by the aroma of slow-cooked meats, fresh vegetables, and handmade noodles, hungry diners step up to Boke Bowl’s counter to place their orders. Their selections are served up hot, fresh, and fast at communal tables in a modern urban setting.
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    To our north is one of the Earth’s last wild places: the Canadian boreal forest. At 2.2 million square miles—nearly 60 percent the size of the United States—it’s one of the planet’s richest habitats.
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    Parked on a residential street in Vancouver, Washington, Ken Westin noticed movement to his left and felt his pulse quicken. A menacing-looking man, the one Westin recognized as a computer thief, sauntered out of a nearby house and began washing his car. Westin pretended to look for directions on his mobile phone but instead dialed a police detective.
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    Mary Clare drove cross-country over the first 100 days of the Obama administration to capture and share conversations about change.
  • This fall, President Barry Glassner and his wife, Betsy Amster, traveled around the country to meet with alumni, parents, and friends of Lewis & Clark.
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    As Alexis Fox J.D. ‘09 settles into the rhythm of her regular 4-mile run, she can’t help replaying the disturbing video footage in her head. At a Canadian slaughterhouse, a horse is still conscious after being hit by a stun gun. Writhing in pain in the kill box, the mare is then hoisted up by one leg to be butchered and dismembered.
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    The spaceship’s rocket ignites at 50,000 feet above the earth. In a matter of seconds, the craft accelerates to 2,500 mph—over three times the speed of sound— pinning passengers to their seats. Cobalt blue skies fade to black outside large viewing windows. The rocket engine shuts off, its roar replaced by instant quiet.
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    When he was a novice monk, Donald Altman remembers sitting cross-legged on a low futon, swathed in saffron-colored robes. As he contemplated his vows, he became distracted by a giant-sized Cadbury milk chocolate bar that was sitting on a nearby shelf.

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