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Events

February 19th, 2018

  • Image preview All Day: 4th Annual Middle East Symposium

    Monday February 19th


    6pm-7pm,  Howard 102
    Keynote Presentation - Dr. Omar Reda, OHSU
    Dr. Reda a Libyan-American doctor specializing in forensic psychiatrist and teaches at Oregon Health Sciences University. Reda fled his homeland in 1999 upon receiving threat of arrest by Ghaddafi’s forces for delivering food and supplies to families of those imprisoned by the regime. Over the past decade, Reda has frequently returned to Libya to help those affected by conflict and has worked to create programs to help children recover emotionally from experiences of trauma.  

     

    7:15-8:30pm, Smith Hall
    Symposium Dinner Banquet
    Members of the Lewis & Clark Community are invited to attend a dinner banquet for all symposium presenters, organizers, and guests. This gathering is an opportunity to interact with presenters and recognize the efforts of the steering committee. This event is catered by Ya-Hala Lebanese Cuisine. 

     


    Tuesday February 20th 


     

    2pm-3pm, Location TBA
    The ‘Cyprus Conflict’: The Experiences of a Fulbright-Hayes Participant on an Island Divided
    Omeica Hudson, Department of Education Fulbright-Hayes Participant
    Presentation Abstract: ”Cyprus is an island off the coast of Turkey that has had multiple civil wars between ethnicities over political power sharing. These wars led to UN peacekeeping troops helping to create a ceasefire in 1974 that is still in effect today. This conflict has been termed the “Cyprus Conflict”.

    The wars split Cyprus into two nations based on ethnicity: the southern, Greek (The Republic of Cyprus) and the northern, Turkish,( Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus) There is a “UN Buffer Zone” called the “Green Line” that stretches 112 miles from north to south and is about 4 miles wide at its widest point. Most of the buffer zone is a graveyard and time capsule of lost lives, land, homes, and histories and is now patrolled by UN peacekeeping troops and border patrols. At one point, the “Green Line” runs through the center of the capital city, Nicosia, the only divided capital city in the world. The village of Pyla, located inside the “Green Line”, is the only village in Cyprus where Greeks and Turks communities live and govern together.

    Although there is a ceasefire between these two segregated nations, Cyprus has technically been at war for the last 43 years. UN sponsored negotiation talks have been held many times over the last 43 years without success. The last negotiations were in the works this summer. As I lived among those hoping for progress towards reunification through an equitable bi-communal, bi-zonal federation, there was a palpable sense of loss and frustration when the news broke in July that the UN-sponsored talks ended without



    any resolution.”


     

    4pm-5pm, Albany 218
    “Collective Amnesia: The Multi-Cultural Contributions of Al-Andalus to Western Civilization”
    Dr. Julia Bazi, Lewis & Clark Professor of Music 
    Presentation abstract:  For almost 800 years, Al Andalus fostered an enlightened culture in which three great Abrahamic traditions — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — co-existed, interacted, and flourished. During the time of Al Andalus (711-1492), individuals of different ethnicities and faiths created an advanced and thriving culture which has had a lasting effect on world culture. So much of what we know and employ today dates back to this period. Modern-day science, technology, math, astronomy, medicine, music, agriculture, architecture, art and even clothing and dining etiquette can all find their roots centuries earlier in Islamic Spain. And yet, this is not a history with which many of us are familiar.The capacity of a memory to endure depends on the social power of the group that holds it and records that history. Collective memory implies by extension, the concept of collective forgetting. This phenomena has its own history. This presentation explores how older Iberian memories continue to influence our present and how the period of Al Andalus, often entirely ignored in our Western History books has had, and continues to have far reaching consequences in the present.


    5:30-6:30pm, Albany 218

    Morocco Student Research Panel
    Moderator: 
    Dr. Oren Kosansky, Lewis & Clark Professor of Sociology & Anthropology and Director of the Middle East & North African Studies (MENA) Minor. 
    • Bradley Davis CAS ’18, “Philosophy and the Islamic Republic”
    • Emily Hayes-Rich CAS ’19, “The Moroccan Khettara: State Influences Over Rural, Desert
      Morocco from the 7th Century to the Present.” 


    7pm-8pm, Howard 102

    Film Screening: White Helmets 

    This 2016 documentary, set in Aleppo follows the daily operations of volunteer rescue workers known as the White Helmets as they work to save civilians affected by Syria’s civil war. A short discussion will follow the screening. Pizza will be provided at this event. 


     


    Wednesday February 19th 


     


    12:30pm-1:30pm, Albany 218
    Identity & Belonging : Student Research Panel
    • Naomi Goldman-Nagel CAS ’19, “Monologues From a Girl with a Multifaceted Identity.”
    • Lindsey Clark CAS ’18, “The Arab Spring ‘Success’ Case: Challenges to Tunisia’s      
      Democratic Transition.”
    • Noam Margalit CAS ’18, “A Society Built on Death’: Examining the Presence and
      Absence of Dying in Israel.”  

     

    4:30-5:30pm, Howard 102

    “Explaining Women’s Electability: Role Congruity and the Importance of Candidate Type”
    Dr. Lindsay Benstead, Portland State University Professor of Political Science and Interim Director of the Middle East Studies Center (MESC)

    Presentation abstract: Ensuring female representation has been at the forefront of the global development agenda. Yet, little is known about which traits or social, economic, or political roles make women more electable. When and why do voters cast ballots for women, and how can insights into this help scholars, policymakers, and development specialists have a clearer understanding of the prospects of increasing women’s roles? Gender role congruity theory argues that bias against females for leadership roles stems from a mismatch between stereotyped gender roles and the traits associated with a “good leader.” We extend this theory by arguing that the credentials that candidates emphasize, such as their success as business entrepreneurs or civil society activists, has a significant influence on the extent to which voters prefer male over female voters because candidates are also judged as effective occupants of these roles when considered as future political leaders. Drawing on data from four original survey experiments conducted in Tunisia, Egypt, and Jordan between 2012 and 2014, we show that electability varies according to the skills candidates bring to the job. In the survey experiment, respondents were presented at random with brief descriptions of candidates who were either male or female and engaged in civil society work or business. We find strong and consistent evidence across the four countries that voters prefer business candidates to civil society candidates. Moreover, males in particular prefer male candidates to female candidates. But, the gender gap in electability is larger for business candidates – roles for which women are often stereotyped as unfit – than civil society candidates. When male and female candidates are running on civil society platforms, the gender bias at the polls is narrowed. We argue that this is because many view women as caring and community-oriented, and thus as having the traits that many equate with successful civil society activists.

     

    6pm, Stamm
    Musical Performance by the Al Andalus Ensemble 
    Al-Andalus Ensemble an award winning musical ensemble that performs both traditional Andalusian music and contemporary work.  It is internationally known for its innovative fusion of Middle Eastern, North African, European and American traditions, which it represents through world, jazz, flamenco and classical music. The group’s spectrum of work includes original Nuevo-Andalusian and jazz pieces to stirring renditions of American spirituals to thrilling, improvised percussion solos played on traditional clay drums, and much more.

    until February 21
  • Image preview 10:30am - 2:00pm: Girl Scout Cookie Sales
    Girl Scout Cookie Season is here!

    Stop by the table outside the Bon and purchase Girl Scout Cookies from area Girl Scout Troops.
  • Image preview 4:30pm - 7:30pm: Girl Scout Cookie Sales
    Girl Scout Cookie Season is here!

    Stop by the table outside the Bon and purchase Girl Scout Cookies from area Girl Scout Troops.
  • Image preview 7:00pm - 8:30pm: Call for Poetry Submissions – World Language Poetry Night
    Call for Submissions!
    World Language Poetry Night

    Theme: Beyond the wall - breaking down cultural stereotypes
    Submissions may be in English or your home language
    Poems may be written by you or your favorite poet

    Selected individuals will present their poems on Tuesday, February 27th from 7pm to 8:30pm.

February 20th, 2018

  • Image preview All Day: 4th Annual Middle East Symposium

    Monday February 19th


    6pm-7pm,  Howard 102
    Keynote Presentation - Dr. Omar Reda, OHSU
    Dr. Reda a Libyan-American doctor specializing in forensic psychiatrist and teaches at Oregon Health Sciences University. Reda fled his homeland in 1999 upon receiving threat of arrest by Ghaddafi’s forces for delivering food and supplies to families of those imprisoned by the regime. Over the past decade, Reda has frequently returned to Libya to help those affected by conflict and has worked to create programs to help children recover emotionally from experiences of trauma.  

     

    7:15-8:30pm, Smith Hall
    Symposium Dinner Banquet
    Members of the Lewis & Clark Community are invited to attend a dinner banquet for all symposium presenters, organizers, and guests. This gathering is an opportunity to interact with presenters and recognize the efforts of the steering committee. This event is catered by Ya-Hala Lebanese Cuisine. 

     


    Tuesday February 20th 


     

    2pm-3pm, Location TBA
    The ‘Cyprus Conflict’: The Experiences of a Fulbright-Hayes Participant on an Island Divided
    Omeica Hudson, Department of Education Fulbright-Hayes Participant
    Presentation Abstract: ”Cyprus is an island off the coast of Turkey that has had multiple civil wars between ethnicities over political power sharing. These wars led to UN peacekeeping troops helping to create a ceasefire in 1974 that is still in effect today. This conflict has been termed the “Cyprus Conflict”.

    The wars split Cyprus into two nations based on ethnicity: the southern, Greek (The Republic of Cyprus) and the northern, Turkish,( Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus) There is a “UN Buffer Zone” called the “Green Line” that stretches 112 miles from north to south and is about 4 miles wide at its widest point. Most of the buffer zone is a graveyard and time capsule of lost lives, land, homes, and histories and is now patrolled by UN peacekeeping troops and border patrols. At one point, the “Green Line” runs through the center of the capital city, Nicosia, the only divided capital city in the world. The village of Pyla, located inside the “Green Line”, is the only village in Cyprus where Greeks and Turks communities live and govern together.

    Although there is a ceasefire between these two segregated nations, Cyprus has technically been at war for the last 43 years. UN sponsored negotiation talks have been held many times over the last 43 years without success. The last negotiations were in the works this summer. As I lived among those hoping for progress towards reunification through an equitable bi-communal, bi-zonal federation, there was a palpable sense of loss and frustration when the news broke in July that the UN-sponsored talks ended without



    any resolution.”


     

    4pm-5pm, Albany 218
    “Collective Amnesia: The Multi-Cultural Contributions of Al-Andalus to Western Civilization”
    Dr. Julia Bazi, Lewis & Clark Professor of Music 
    Presentation abstract:  For almost 800 years, Al Andalus fostered an enlightened culture in which three great Abrahamic traditions — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — co-existed, interacted, and flourished. During the time of Al Andalus (711-1492), individuals of different ethnicities and faiths created an advanced and thriving culture which has had a lasting effect on world culture. So much of what we know and employ today dates back to this period. Modern-day science, technology, math, astronomy, medicine, music, agriculture, architecture, art and even clothing and dining etiquette can all find their roots centuries earlier in Islamic Spain. And yet, this is not a history with which many of us are familiar.The capacity of a memory to endure depends on the social power of the group that holds it and records that history. Collective memory implies by extension, the concept of collective forgetting. This phenomena has its own history. This presentation explores how older Iberian memories continue to influence our present and how the period of Al Andalus, often entirely ignored in our Western History books has had, and continues to have far reaching consequences in the present.


    5:30-6:30pm, Albany 218

    Morocco Student Research Panel
    Moderator: 
    Dr. Oren Kosansky, Lewis & Clark Professor of Sociology & Anthropology and Director of the Middle East & North African Studies (MENA) Minor. 
    • Bradley Davis CAS ’18, “Philosophy and the Islamic Republic”
    • Emily Hayes-Rich CAS ’19, “The Moroccan Khettara: State Influences Over Rural, Desert
      Morocco from the 7th Century to the Present.” 


    7pm-8pm, Howard 102

    Film Screening: White Helmets 

    This 2016 documentary, set in Aleppo follows the daily operations of volunteer rescue workers known as the White Helmets as they work to save civilians affected by Syria’s civil war. A short discussion will follow the screening. Pizza will be provided at this event. 


     


    Wednesday February 19th 


     


    12:30pm-1:30pm, Albany 218
    Identity & Belonging : Student Research Panel
    • Naomi Goldman-Nagel CAS ’19, “Monologues From a Girl with a Multifaceted Identity.”
    • Lindsey Clark CAS ’18, “The Arab Spring ‘Success’ Case: Challenges to Tunisia’s      
      Democratic Transition.”
    • Noam Margalit CAS ’18, “A Society Built on Death’: Examining the Presence and
      Absence of Dying in Israel.”  

     

    4:30-5:30pm, Howard 102

    “Explaining Women’s Electability: Role Congruity and the Importance of Candidate Type”
    Dr. Lindsay Benstead, Portland State University Professor of Political Science and Interim Director of the Middle East Studies Center (MESC)

    Presentation abstract: Ensuring female representation has been at the forefront of the global development agenda. Yet, little is known about which traits or social, economic, or political roles make women more electable. When and why do voters cast ballots for women, and how can insights into this help scholars, policymakers, and development specialists have a clearer understanding of the prospects of increasing women’s roles? Gender role congruity theory argues that bias against females for leadership roles stems from a mismatch between stereotyped gender roles and the traits associated with a “good leader.” We extend this theory by arguing that the credentials that candidates emphasize, such as their success as business entrepreneurs or civil society activists, has a significant influence on the extent to which voters prefer male over female voters because candidates are also judged as effective occupants of these roles when considered as future political leaders. Drawing on data from four original survey experiments conducted in Tunisia, Egypt, and Jordan between 2012 and 2014, we show that electability varies according to the skills candidates bring to the job. In the survey experiment, respondents were presented at random with brief descriptions of candidates who were either male or female and engaged in civil society work or business. We find strong and consistent evidence across the four countries that voters prefer business candidates to civil society candidates. Moreover, males in particular prefer male candidates to female candidates. But, the gender gap in electability is larger for business candidates – roles for which women are often stereotyped as unfit – than civil society candidates. When male and female candidates are running on civil society platforms, the gender bias at the polls is narrowed. We argue that this is because many view women as caring and community-oriented, and thus as having the traits that many equate with successful civil society activists.

     

    6pm, Stamm
    Musical Performance by the Al Andalus Ensemble 
    Al-Andalus Ensemble an award winning musical ensemble that performs both traditional Andalusian music and contemporary work.  It is internationally known for its innovative fusion of Middle Eastern, North African, European and American traditions, which it represents through world, jazz, flamenco and classical music. The group’s spectrum of work includes original Nuevo-Andalusian and jazz pieces to stirring renditions of American spirituals to thrilling, improvised percussion solos played on traditional clay drums, and much more.

    until February 22
  • Image preview All Day: 4th Annual Middle East Symposium

    Monday February 19th


    6pm-7pm,  Howard 102
    Keynote Presentation - Dr. Omar Reda, OHSU
    Dr. Reda a Libyan-American doctor specializing in forensic psychiatrist and teaches at Oregon Health Sciences University. Reda fled his homeland in 1999 upon receiving threat of arrest by Ghaddafi’s forces for delivering food and supplies to families of those imprisoned by the regime. Over the past decade, Reda has frequently returned to Libya to help those affected by conflict and has worked to create programs to help children recover emotionally from experiences of trauma.  

     

    7:15-8:30pm, Smith Hall
    Symposium Dinner Banquet
    Members of the Lewis & Clark Community are invited to attend a dinner banquet for all symposium presenters, organizers, and guests. This gathering is an opportunity to interact with presenters and recognize the efforts of the steering committee. This event is catered by Ya-Hala Lebanese Cuisine. 

     


    Tuesday February 20th 


     

    2pm-3pm, Location TBA
    The ‘Cyprus Conflict’: The Experiences of a Fulbright-Hayes Participant on an Island Divided
    Omeica Hudson, Department of Education Fulbright-Hayes Participant
    Presentation Abstract: ”Cyprus is an island off the coast of Turkey that has had multiple civil wars between ethnicities over political power sharing. These wars led to UN peacekeeping troops helping to create a ceasefire in 1974 that is still in effect today. This conflict has been termed the “Cyprus Conflict”.

    The wars split Cyprus into two nations based on ethnicity: the southern, Greek (The Republic of Cyprus) and the northern, Turkish,( Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus) There is a “UN Buffer Zone” called the “Green Line” that stretches 112 miles from north to south and is about 4 miles wide at its widest point. Most of the buffer zone is a graveyard and time capsule of lost lives, land, homes, and histories and is now patrolled by UN peacekeeping troops and border patrols. At one point, the “Green Line” runs through the center of the capital city, Nicosia, the only divided capital city in the world. The village of Pyla, located inside the “Green Line”, is the only village in Cyprus where Greeks and Turks communities live and govern together.

    Although there is a ceasefire between these two segregated nations, Cyprus has technically been at war for the last 43 years. UN sponsored negotiation talks have been held many times over the last 43 years without success. The last negotiations were in the works this summer. As I lived among those hoping for progress towards reunification through an equitable bi-communal, bi-zonal federation, there was a palpable sense of loss and frustration when the news broke in July that the UN-sponsored talks ended without



    any resolution.”


     

    4pm-5pm, Albany 218
    “Collective Amnesia: The Multi-Cultural Contributions of Al-Andalus to Western Civilization”
    Dr. Julia Bazi, Lewis & Clark Professor of Music 
    Presentation abstract:  For almost 800 years, Al Andalus fostered an enlightened culture in which three great Abrahamic traditions — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — co-existed, interacted, and flourished. During the time of Al Andalus (711-1492), individuals of different ethnicities and faiths created an advanced and thriving culture which has had a lasting effect on world culture. So much of what we know and employ today dates back to this period. Modern-day science, technology, math, astronomy, medicine, music, agriculture, architecture, art and even clothing and dining etiquette can all find their roots centuries earlier in Islamic Spain. And yet, this is not a history with which many of us are familiar.The capacity of a memory to endure depends on the social power of the group that holds it and records that history. Collective memory implies by extension, the concept of collective forgetting. This phenomena has its own history. This presentation explores how older Iberian memories continue to influence our present and how the period of Al Andalus, often entirely ignored in our Western History books has had, and continues to have far reaching consequences in the present.


    5:30-6:30pm, Albany 218

    Morocco Student Research Panel
    Moderator: 
    Dr. Oren Kosansky, Lewis & Clark Professor of Sociology & Anthropology and Director of the Middle East & North African Studies (MENA) Minor. 
    • Bradley Davis CAS ’18, “Philosophy and the Islamic Republic”
    • Emily Hayes-Rich CAS ’19, “The Moroccan Khettara: State Influences Over Rural, Desert
      Morocco from the 7th Century to the Present.” 


    7pm-8pm, Howard 102

    Film Screening: White Helmets 

    This 2016 documentary, set in Aleppo follows the daily operations of volunteer rescue workers known as the White Helmets as they work to save civilians affected by Syria’s civil war. A short discussion will follow the screening. Pizza will be provided at this event. 


     


    Wednesday February 19th 


     


    12:30pm-1:30pm, Albany 218
    Identity & Belonging : Student Research Panel
    • Naomi Goldman-Nagel CAS ’19, “Monologues From a Girl with a Multifaceted Identity.”
    • Lindsey Clark CAS ’18, “The Arab Spring ‘Success’ Case: Challenges to Tunisia’s      
      Democratic Transition.”
    • Noam Margalit CAS ’18, “A Society Built on Death’: Examining the Presence and
      Absence of Dying in Israel.”  

     

    4:30-5:30pm, Howard 102

    “Explaining Women’s Electability: Role Congruity and the Importance of Candidate Type”
    Dr. Lindsay Benstead, Portland State University Professor of Political Science and Interim Director of the Middle East Studies Center (MESC)

    Presentation abstract: Ensuring female representation has been at the forefront of the global development agenda. Yet, little is known about which traits or social, economic, or political roles make women more electable. When and why do voters cast ballots for women, and how can insights into this help scholars, policymakers, and development specialists have a clearer understanding of the prospects of increasing women’s roles? Gender role congruity theory argues that bias against females for leadership roles stems from a mismatch between stereotyped gender roles and the traits associated with a “good leader.” We extend this theory by arguing that the credentials that candidates emphasize, such as their success as business entrepreneurs or civil society activists, has a significant influence on the extent to which voters prefer male over female voters because candidates are also judged as effective occupants of these roles when considered as future political leaders. Drawing on data from four original survey experiments conducted in Tunisia, Egypt, and Jordan between 2012 and 2014, we show that electability varies according to the skills candidates bring to the job. In the survey experiment, respondents were presented at random with brief descriptions of candidates who were either male or female and engaged in civil society work or business. We find strong and consistent evidence across the four countries that voters prefer business candidates to civil society candidates. Moreover, males in particular prefer male candidates to female candidates. But, the gender gap in electability is larger for business candidates – roles for which women are often stereotyped as unfit – than civil society candidates. When male and female candidates are running on civil society platforms, the gender bias at the polls is narrowed. We argue that this is because many view women as caring and community-oriented, and thus as having the traits that many equate with successful civil society activists.

     

    6pm, Stamm
    Musical Performance by the Al Andalus Ensemble 
    Al-Andalus Ensemble an award winning musical ensemble that performs both traditional Andalusian music and contemporary work.  It is internationally known for its innovative fusion of Middle Eastern, North African, European and American traditions, which it represents through world, jazz, flamenco and classical music. The group’s spectrum of work includes original Nuevo-Andalusian and jazz pieces to stirring renditions of American spirituals to thrilling, improvised percussion solos played on traditional clay drums, and much more.

    until February 21
  • Image preview 3:00pm - 6:00pm: 6th Annual TCK Symposium: Lost (and Found) in Translation – Bridging the Gap Between Cultures

    The Third Culture Kids Club will be welcoming Emmy and Telly award-winning producer, speaker, author and educator Teja Arboleda for the 6th Annual TCK Symposium. Third Culture Kids are a group of people who grew up outside of their parents’ culture. We will discuss transitional issues when navigating between cultures that both TCKs and non-TCKs face, and what we can do to make cross-cultural transitions easier. Some key topics will include: assimilation, integration, culture shock and reverse culture shock, traditions or language that cannot be translated, and stereotypes. We will also talk about how these experiences impact identity and relationships with others. Both TCKs and non-TCKs are welcome!

    Symposium Schedule
    3-3:30pm – Reception
    3:30-5pm – Keynote
    5-6pm – Panel Discussion

  • Image preview 4:30pm - 7:30pm: Girl Scout Cookie Sales
    Girl Scout Cookie Season is here!

    Stop by the table outside the Bon and purchase Girl Scout Cookies from area Girl Scout Troops.

February 21st, 2018

  • Image preview All Day: 4th Annual Middle East Symposium

    Monday February 19th


    6pm-7pm,  Howard 102
    Keynote Presentation - Dr. Omar Reda, OHSU
    Dr. Reda a Libyan-American doctor specializing in forensic psychiatrist and teaches at Oregon Health Sciences University. Reda fled his homeland in 1999 upon receiving threat of arrest by Ghaddafi’s forces for delivering food and supplies to families of those imprisoned by the regime. Over the past decade, Reda has frequently returned to Libya to help those affected by conflict and has worked to create programs to help children recover emotionally from experiences of trauma.  

     

    7:15-8:30pm, Smith Hall
    Symposium Dinner Banquet
    Members of the Lewis & Clark Community are invited to attend a dinner banquet for all symposium presenters, organizers, and guests. This gathering is an opportunity to interact with presenters and recognize the efforts of the steering committee. This event is catered by Ya-Hala Lebanese Cuisine. 

     


    Tuesday February 20th 


     

    2pm-3pm, Location TBA
    The ‘Cyprus Conflict’: The Experiences of a Fulbright-Hayes Participant on an Island Divided
    Omeica Hudson, Department of Education Fulbright-Hayes Participant
    Presentation Abstract: ”Cyprus is an island off the coast of Turkey that has had multiple civil wars between ethnicities over political power sharing. These wars led to UN peacekeeping troops helping to create a ceasefire in 1974 that is still in effect today. This conflict has been termed the “Cyprus Conflict”.

    The wars split Cyprus into two nations based on ethnicity: the southern, Greek (The Republic of Cyprus) and the northern, Turkish,( Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus) There is a “UN Buffer Zone” called the “Green Line” that stretches 112 miles from north to south and is about 4 miles wide at its widest point. Most of the buffer zone is a graveyard and time capsule of lost lives, land, homes, and histories and is now patrolled by UN peacekeeping troops and border patrols. At one point, the “Green Line” runs through the center of the capital city, Nicosia, the only divided capital city in the world. The village of Pyla, located inside the “Green Line”, is the only village in Cyprus where Greeks and Turks communities live and govern together.

    Although there is a ceasefire between these two segregated nations, Cyprus has technically been at war for the last 43 years. UN sponsored negotiation talks have been held many times over the last 43 years without success. The last negotiations were in the works this summer. As I lived among those hoping for progress towards reunification through an equitable bi-communal, bi-zonal federation, there was a palpable sense of loss and frustration when the news broke in July that the UN-sponsored talks ended without



    any resolution.”


     

    4pm-5pm, Albany 218
    “Collective Amnesia: The Multi-Cultural Contributions of Al-Andalus to Western Civilization”
    Dr. Julia Bazi, Lewis & Clark Professor of Music 
    Presentation abstract:  For almost 800 years, Al Andalus fostered an enlightened culture in which three great Abrahamic traditions — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — co-existed, interacted, and flourished. During the time of Al Andalus (711-1492), individuals of different ethnicities and faiths created an advanced and thriving culture which has had a lasting effect on world culture. So much of what we know and employ today dates back to this period. Modern-day science, technology, math, astronomy, medicine, music, agriculture, architecture, art and even clothing and dining etiquette can all find their roots centuries earlier in Islamic Spain. And yet, this is not a history with which many of us are familiar.The capacity of a memory to endure depends on the social power of the group that holds it and records that history. Collective memory implies by extension, the concept of collective forgetting. This phenomena has its own history. This presentation explores how older Iberian memories continue to influence our present and how the period of Al Andalus, often entirely ignored in our Western History books has had, and continues to have far reaching consequences in the present.


    5:30-6:30pm, Albany 218

    Morocco Student Research Panel
    Moderator: 
    Dr. Oren Kosansky, Lewis & Clark Professor of Sociology & Anthropology and Director of the Middle East & North African Studies (MENA) Minor. 
    • Bradley Davis CAS ’18, “Philosophy and the Islamic Republic”
    • Emily Hayes-Rich CAS ’19, “The Moroccan Khettara: State Influences Over Rural, Desert
      Morocco from the 7th Century to the Present.” 


    7pm-8pm, Howard 102

    Film Screening: White Helmets 

    This 2016 documentary, set in Aleppo follows the daily operations of volunteer rescue workers known as the White Helmets as they work to save civilians affected by Syria’s civil war. A short discussion will follow the screening. Pizza will be provided at this event. 


     


    Wednesday February 19th 


     


    12:30pm-1:30pm, Albany 218
    Identity & Belonging : Student Research Panel
    • Naomi Goldman-Nagel CAS ’19, “Monologues From a Girl with a Multifaceted Identity.”
    • Lindsey Clark CAS ’18, “The Arab Spring ‘Success’ Case: Challenges to Tunisia’s      
      Democratic Transition.”
    • Noam Margalit CAS ’18, “A Society Built on Death’: Examining the Presence and
      Absence of Dying in Israel.”  

     

    4:30-5:30pm, Howard 102

    “Explaining Women’s Electability: Role Congruity and the Importance of Candidate Type”
    Dr. Lindsay Benstead, Portland State University Professor of Political Science and Interim Director of the Middle East Studies Center (MESC)

    Presentation abstract: Ensuring female representation has been at the forefront of the global development agenda. Yet, little is known about which traits or social, economic, or political roles make women more electable. When and why do voters cast ballots for women, and how can insights into this help scholars, policymakers, and development specialists have a clearer understanding of the prospects of increasing women’s roles? Gender role congruity theory argues that bias against females for leadership roles stems from a mismatch between stereotyped gender roles and the traits associated with a “good leader.” We extend this theory by arguing that the credentials that candidates emphasize, such as their success as business entrepreneurs or civil society activists, has a significant influence on the extent to which voters prefer male over female voters because candidates are also judged as effective occupants of these roles when considered as future political leaders. Drawing on data from four original survey experiments conducted in Tunisia, Egypt, and Jordan between 2012 and 2014, we show that electability varies according to the skills candidates bring to the job. In the survey experiment, respondents were presented at random with brief descriptions of candidates who were either male or female and engaged in civil society work or business. We find strong and consistent evidence across the four countries that voters prefer business candidates to civil society candidates. Moreover, males in particular prefer male candidates to female candidates. But, the gender gap in electability is larger for business candidates – roles for which women are often stereotyped as unfit – than civil society candidates. When male and female candidates are running on civil society platforms, the gender bias at the polls is narrowed. We argue that this is because many view women as caring and community-oriented, and thus as having the traits that many equate with successful civil society activists.

     

    6pm, Stamm
    Musical Performance by the Al Andalus Ensemble 
    Al-Andalus Ensemble an award winning musical ensemble that performs both traditional Andalusian music and contemporary work.  It is internationally known for its innovative fusion of Middle Eastern, North African, European and American traditions, which it represents through world, jazz, flamenco and classical music. The group’s spectrum of work includes original Nuevo-Andalusian and jazz pieces to stirring renditions of American spirituals to thrilling, improvised percussion solos played on traditional clay drums, and much more.

  • Image preview All Day: 4th Annual Middle East Symposium

    Monday February 19th


    6pm-7pm,  Howard 102
    Keynote Presentation - Dr. Omar Reda, OHSU
    Dr. Reda a Libyan-American doctor specializing in forensic psychiatrist and teaches at Oregon Health Sciences University. Reda fled his homeland in 1999 upon receiving threat of arrest by Ghaddafi’s forces for delivering food and supplies to families of those imprisoned by the regime. Over the past decade, Reda has frequently returned to Libya to help those affected by conflict and has worked to create programs to help children recover emotionally from experiences of trauma.  

     

    7:15-8:30pm, Smith Hall
    Symposium Dinner Banquet
    Members of the Lewis & Clark Community are invited to attend a dinner banquet for all symposium presenters, organizers, and guests. This gathering is an opportunity to interact with presenters and recognize the efforts of the steering committee. This event is catered by Ya-Hala Lebanese Cuisine. 

     


    Tuesday February 20th 


     

    2pm-3pm, Location TBA
    The ‘Cyprus Conflict’: The Experiences of a Fulbright-Hayes Participant on an Island Divided
    Omeica Hudson, Department of Education Fulbright-Hayes Participant
    Presentation Abstract: ”Cyprus is an island off the coast of Turkey that has had multiple civil wars between ethnicities over political power sharing. These wars led to UN peacekeeping troops helping to create a ceasefire in 1974 that is still in effect today. This conflict has been termed the “Cyprus Conflict”.

    The wars split Cyprus into two nations based on ethnicity: the southern, Greek (The Republic of Cyprus) and the northern, Turkish,( Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus) There is a “UN Buffer Zone” called the “Green Line” that stretches 112 miles from north to south and is about 4 miles wide at its widest point. Most of the buffer zone is a graveyard and time capsule of lost lives, land, homes, and histories and is now patrolled by UN peacekeeping troops and border patrols. At one point, the “Green Line” runs through the center of the capital city, Nicosia, the only divided capital city in the world. The village of Pyla, located inside the “Green Line”, is the only village in Cyprus where Greeks and Turks communities live and govern together.

    Although there is a ceasefire between these two segregated nations, Cyprus has technically been at war for the last 43 years. UN sponsored negotiation talks have been held many times over the last 43 years without success. The last negotiations were in the works this summer. As I lived among those hoping for progress towards reunification through an equitable bi-communal, bi-zonal federation, there was a palpable sense of loss and frustration when the news broke in July that the UN-sponsored talks ended without



    any resolution.”


     

    4pm-5pm, Albany 218
    “Collective Amnesia: The Multi-Cultural Contributions of Al-Andalus to Western Civilization”
    Dr. Julia Bazi, Lewis & Clark Professor of Music 
    Presentation abstract:  For almost 800 years, Al Andalus fostered an enlightened culture in which three great Abrahamic traditions — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — co-existed, interacted, and flourished. During the time of Al Andalus (711-1492), individuals of different ethnicities and faiths created an advanced and thriving culture which has had a lasting effect on world culture. So much of what we know and employ today dates back to this period. Modern-day science, technology, math, astronomy, medicine, music, agriculture, architecture, art and even clothing and dining etiquette can all find their roots centuries earlier in Islamic Spain. And yet, this is not a history with which many of us are familiar.The capacity of a memory to endure depends on the social power of the group that holds it and records that history. Collective memory implies by extension, the concept of collective forgetting. This phenomena has its own history. This presentation explores how older Iberian memories continue to influence our present and how the period of Al Andalus, often entirely ignored in our Western History books has had, and continues to have far reaching consequences in the present.


    5:30-6:30pm, Albany 218

    Morocco Student Research Panel
    Moderator: 
    Dr. Oren Kosansky, Lewis & Clark Professor of Sociology & Anthropology and Director of the Middle East & North African Studies (MENA) Minor. 
    • Bradley Davis CAS ’18, “Philosophy and the Islamic Republic”
    • Emily Hayes-Rich CAS ’19, “The Moroccan Khettara: State Influences Over Rural, Desert
      Morocco from the 7th Century to the Present.” 


    7pm-8pm, Howard 102

    Film Screening: White Helmets 

    This 2016 documentary, set in Aleppo follows the daily operations of volunteer rescue workers known as the White Helmets as they work to save civilians affected by Syria’s civil war. A short discussion will follow the screening. Pizza will be provided at this event. 


     


    Wednesday February 19th 


     


    12:30pm-1:30pm, Albany 218
    Identity & Belonging : Student Research Panel
    • Naomi Goldman-Nagel CAS ’19, “Monologues From a Girl with a Multifaceted Identity.”
    • Lindsey Clark CAS ’18, “The Arab Spring ‘Success’ Case: Challenges to Tunisia’s      
      Democratic Transition.”
    • Noam Margalit CAS ’18, “A Society Built on Death’: Examining the Presence and
      Absence of Dying in Israel.”  

     

    4:30-5:30pm, Howard 102

    “Explaining Women’s Electability: Role Congruity and the Importance of Candidate Type”
    Dr. Lindsay Benstead, Portland State University Professor of Political Science and Interim Director of the Middle East Studies Center (MESC)

    Presentation abstract: Ensuring female representation has been at the forefront of the global development agenda. Yet, little is known about which traits or social, economic, or political roles make women more electable. When and why do voters cast ballots for women, and how can insights into this help scholars, policymakers, and development specialists have a clearer understanding of the prospects of increasing women’s roles? Gender role congruity theory argues that bias against females for leadership roles stems from a mismatch between stereotyped gender roles and the traits associated with a “good leader.” We extend this theory by arguing that the credentials that candidates emphasize, such as their success as business entrepreneurs or civil society activists, has a significant influence on the extent to which voters prefer male over female voters because candidates are also judged as effective occupants of these roles when considered as future political leaders. Drawing on data from four original survey experiments conducted in Tunisia, Egypt, and Jordan between 2012 and 2014, we show that electability varies according to the skills candidates bring to the job. In the survey experiment, respondents were presented at random with brief descriptions of candidates who were either male or female and engaged in civil society work or business. We find strong and consistent evidence across the four countries that voters prefer business candidates to civil society candidates. Moreover, males in particular prefer male candidates to female candidates. But, the gender gap in electability is larger for business candidates – roles for which women are often stereotyped as unfit – than civil society candidates. When male and female candidates are running on civil society platforms, the gender bias at the polls is narrowed. We argue that this is because many view women as caring and community-oriented, and thus as having the traits that many equate with successful civil society activists.

     

    6pm, Stamm
    Musical Performance by the Al Andalus Ensemble 
    Al-Andalus Ensemble an award winning musical ensemble that performs both traditional Andalusian music and contemporary work.  It is internationally known for its innovative fusion of Middle Eastern, North African, European and American traditions, which it represents through world, jazz, flamenco and classical music. The group’s spectrum of work includes original Nuevo-Andalusian and jazz pieces to stirring renditions of American spirituals to thrilling, improvised percussion solos played on traditional clay drums, and much more.

    until February 22
  • Image preview All Day: 4th Annual Middle East Symposium

    Monday February 19th


    6pm-7pm,  Howard 102
    Keynote Presentation - Dr. Omar Reda, OHSU
    Dr. Reda a Libyan-American doctor specializing in forensic psychiatrist and teaches at Oregon Health Sciences University. Reda fled his homeland in 1999 upon receiving threat of arrest by Ghaddafi’s forces for delivering food and supplies to families of those imprisoned by the regime. Over the past decade, Reda has frequently returned to Libya to help those affected by conflict and has worked to create programs to help children recover emotionally from experiences of trauma.  

     

    7:15-8:30pm, Smith Hall
    Symposium Dinner Banquet
    Members of the Lewis & Clark Community are invited to attend a dinner banquet for all symposium presenters, organizers, and guests. This gathering is an opportunity to interact with presenters and recognize the efforts of the steering committee. This event is catered by Ya-Hala Lebanese Cuisine. 

     


    Tuesday February 20th 


     

    2pm-3pm, Location TBA
    The ‘Cyprus Conflict’: The Experiences of a Fulbright-Hayes Participant on an Island Divided
    Omeica Hudson, Department of Education Fulbright-Hayes Participant
    Presentation Abstract: ”Cyprus is an island off the coast of Turkey that has had multiple civil wars between ethnicities over political power sharing. These wars led to UN peacekeeping troops helping to create a ceasefire in 1974 that is still in effect today. This conflict has been termed the “Cyprus Conflict”.

    The wars split Cyprus into two nations based on ethnicity: the southern, Greek (The Republic of Cyprus) and the northern, Turkish,( Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus) There is a “UN Buffer Zone” called the “Green Line” that stretches 112 miles from north to south and is about 4 miles wide at its widest point. Most of the buffer zone is a graveyard and time capsule of lost lives, land, homes, and histories and is now patrolled by UN peacekeeping troops and border patrols. At one point, the “Green Line” runs through the center of the capital city, Nicosia, the only divided capital city in the world. The village of Pyla, located inside the “Green Line”, is the only village in Cyprus where Greeks and Turks communities live and govern together.

    Although there is a ceasefire between these two segregated nations, Cyprus has technically been at war for the last 43 years. UN sponsored negotiation talks have been held many times over the last 43 years without success. The last negotiations were in the works this summer. As I lived among those hoping for progress towards reunification through an equitable bi-communal, bi-zonal federation, there was a palpable sense of loss and frustration when the news broke in July that the UN-sponsored talks ended without



    any resolution.”


     

    4pm-5pm, Albany 218
    “Collective Amnesia: The Multi-Cultural Contributions of Al-Andalus to Western Civilization”
    Dr. Julia Bazi, Lewis & Clark Professor of Music 
    Presentation abstract:  For almost 800 years, Al Andalus fostered an enlightened culture in which three great Abrahamic traditions — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — co-existed, interacted, and flourished. During the time of Al Andalus (711-1492), individuals of different ethnicities and faiths created an advanced and thriving culture which has had a lasting effect on world culture. So much of what we know and employ today dates back to this period. Modern-day science, technology, math, astronomy, medicine, music, agriculture, architecture, art and even clothing and dining etiquette can all find their roots centuries earlier in Islamic Spain. And yet, this is not a history with which many of us are familiar.The capacity of a memory to endure depends on the social power of the group that holds it and records that history. Collective memory implies by extension, the concept of collective forgetting. This phenomena has its own history. This presentation explores how older Iberian memories continue to influence our present and how the period of Al Andalus, often entirely ignored in our Western History books has had, and continues to have far reaching consequences in the present.


    5:30-6:30pm, Albany 218

    Morocco Student Research Panel
    Moderator: 
    Dr. Oren Kosansky, Lewis & Clark Professor of Sociology & Anthropology and Director of the Middle East & North African Studies (MENA) Minor. 
    • Bradley Davis CAS ’18, “Philosophy and the Islamic Republic”
    • Emily Hayes-Rich CAS ’19, “The Moroccan Khettara: State Influences Over Rural, Desert
      Morocco from the 7th Century to the Present.” 


    7pm-8pm, Howard 102

    Film Screening: White Helmets 

    This 2016 documentary, set in Aleppo follows the daily operations of volunteer rescue workers known as the White Helmets as they work to save civilians affected by Syria’s civil war. A short discussion will follow the screening. Pizza will be provided at this event. 


     


    Wednesday February 19th 


     


    12:30pm-1:30pm, Albany 218
    Identity & Belonging : Student Research Panel
    • Naomi Goldman-Nagel CAS ’19, “Monologues From a Girl with a Multifaceted Identity.”
    • Lindsey Clark CAS ’18, “The Arab Spring ‘Success’ Case: Challenges to Tunisia’s      
      Democratic Transition.”
    • Noam Margalit CAS ’18, “A Society Built on Death’: Examining the Presence and
      Absence of Dying in Israel.”  

     

    4:30-5:30pm, Howard 102

    “Explaining Women’s Electability: Role Congruity and the Importance of Candidate Type”
    Dr. Lindsay Benstead, Portland State University Professor of Political Science and Interim Director of the Middle East Studies Center (MESC)

    Presentation abstract: Ensuring female representation has been at the forefront of the global development agenda. Yet, little is known about which traits or social, economic, or political roles make women more electable. When and why do voters cast ballots for women, and how can insights into this help scholars, policymakers, and development specialists have a clearer understanding of the prospects of increasing women’s roles? Gender role congruity theory argues that bias against females for leadership roles stems from a mismatch between stereotyped gender roles and the traits associated with a “good leader.” We extend this theory by arguing that the credentials that candidates emphasize, such as their success as business entrepreneurs or civil society activists, has a significant influence on the extent to which voters prefer male over female voters because candidates are also judged as effective occupants of these roles when considered as future political leaders. Drawing on data from four original survey experiments conducted in Tunisia, Egypt, and Jordan between 2012 and 2014, we show that electability varies according to the skills candidates bring to the job. In the survey experiment, respondents were presented at random with brief descriptions of candidates who were either male or female and engaged in civil society work or business. We find strong and consistent evidence across the four countries that voters prefer business candidates to civil society candidates. Moreover, males in particular prefer male candidates to female candidates. But, the gender gap in electability is larger for business candidates – roles for which women are often stereotyped as unfit – than civil society candidates. When male and female candidates are running on civil society platforms, the gender bias at the polls is narrowed. We argue that this is because many view women as caring and community-oriented, and thus as having the traits that many equate with successful civil society activists.

     

    6pm, Stamm
    Musical Performance by the Al Andalus Ensemble 
    Al-Andalus Ensemble an award winning musical ensemble that performs both traditional Andalusian music and contemporary work.  It is internationally known for its innovative fusion of Middle Eastern, North African, European and American traditions, which it represents through world, jazz, flamenco and classical music. The group’s spectrum of work includes original Nuevo-Andalusian and jazz pieces to stirring renditions of American spirituals to thrilling, improvised percussion solos played on traditional clay drums, and much more.

    until February 23
  • Image preview 4:30pm - 7:30pm: Girl Scout Cookie Sales
    Girl Scout Cookie Season is here!

    Stop by the table outside the Bon and purchase Girl Scout Cookies from area Girl Scout Troops.
  • Image preview 7:00pm - 8:30pm: Call for Poetry Submissions – World Language Poetry Night
    Call for Submissions!
    World Language Poetry Night

    Theme: Beyond the wall - breaking down cultural stereotypes
    Submissions may be in English or your home language
    Poems may be written by you or your favorite poet

    Selected individuals will present their poems on Tuesday, February 27th from 7pm to 8:30pm.

February 22nd, 2018

  • Image preview All Day: 4th Annual Middle East Symposium

    Monday February 19th


    6pm-7pm,  Howard 102
    Keynote Presentation - Dr. Omar Reda, OHSU
    Dr. Reda a Libyan-American doctor specializing in forensic psychiatrist and teaches at Oregon Health Sciences University. Reda fled his homeland in 1999 upon receiving threat of arrest by Ghaddafi’s forces for delivering food and supplies to families of those imprisoned by the regime. Over the past decade, Reda has frequently returned to Libya to help those affected by conflict and has worked to create programs to help children recover emotionally from experiences of trauma.  

     

    7:15-8:30pm, Smith Hall
    Symposium Dinner Banquet
    Members of the Lewis & Clark Community are invited to attend a dinner banquet for all symposium presenters, organizers, and guests. This gathering is an opportunity to interact with presenters and recognize the efforts of the steering committee. This event is catered by Ya-Hala Lebanese Cuisine. 

     


    Tuesday February 20th 


     

    2pm-3pm, Location TBA
    The ‘Cyprus Conflict’: The Experiences of a Fulbright-Hayes Participant on an Island Divided
    Omeica Hudson, Department of Education Fulbright-Hayes Participant
    Presentation Abstract: ”Cyprus is an island off the coast of Turkey that has had multiple civil wars between ethnicities over political power sharing. These wars led to UN peacekeeping troops helping to create a ceasefire in 1974 that is still in effect today. This conflict has been termed the “Cyprus Conflict”.

    The wars split Cyprus into two nations based on ethnicity: the southern, Greek (The Republic of Cyprus) and the northern, Turkish,( Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus) There is a “UN Buffer Zone” called the “Green Line” that stretches 112 miles from north to south and is about 4 miles wide at its widest point. Most of the buffer zone is a graveyard and time capsule of lost lives, land, homes, and histories and is now patrolled by UN peacekeeping troops and border patrols. At one point, the “Green Line” runs through the center of the capital city, Nicosia, the only divided capital city in the world. The village of Pyla, located inside the “Green Line”, is the only village in Cyprus where Greeks and Turks communities live and govern together.

    Although there is a ceasefire between these two segregated nations, Cyprus has technically been at war for the last 43 years. UN sponsored negotiation talks have been held many times over the last 43 years without success. The last negotiations were in the works this summer. As I lived among those hoping for progress towards reunification through an equitable bi-communal, bi-zonal federation, there was a palpable sense of loss and frustration when the news broke in July that the UN-sponsored talks ended without



    any resolution.”


     

    4pm-5pm, Albany 218
    “Collective Amnesia: The Multi-Cultural Contributions of Al-Andalus to Western Civilization”
    Dr. Julia Bazi, Lewis & Clark Professor of Music 
    Presentation abstract:  For almost 800 years, Al Andalus fostered an enlightened culture in which three great Abrahamic traditions — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — co-existed, interacted, and flourished. During the time of Al Andalus (711-1492), individuals of different ethnicities and faiths created an advanced and thriving culture which has had a lasting effect on world culture. So much of what we know and employ today dates back to this period. Modern-day science, technology, math, astronomy, medicine, music, agriculture, architecture, art and even clothing and dining etiquette can all find their roots centuries earlier in Islamic Spain. And yet, this is not a history with which many of us are familiar.The capacity of a memory to endure depends on the social power of the group that holds it and records that history. Collective memory implies by extension, the concept of collective forgetting. This phenomena has its own history. This presentation explores how older Iberian memories continue to influence our present and how the period of Al Andalus, often entirely ignored in our Western History books has had, and continues to have far reaching consequences in the present.


    5:30-6:30pm, Albany 218

    Morocco Student Research Panel
    Moderator: 
    Dr. Oren Kosansky, Lewis & Clark Professor of Sociology & Anthropology and Director of the Middle East & North African Studies (MENA) Minor. 
    • Bradley Davis CAS ’18, “Philosophy and the Islamic Republic”
    • Emily Hayes-Rich CAS ’19, “The Moroccan Khettara: State Influences Over Rural, Desert
      Morocco from the 7th Century to the Present.” 


    7pm-8pm, Howard 102

    Film Screening: White Helmets 

    This 2016 documentary, set in Aleppo follows the daily operations of volunteer rescue workers known as the White Helmets as they work to save civilians affected by Syria’s civil war. A short discussion will follow the screening. Pizza will be provided at this event. 


     


    Wednesday February 19th 


     


    12:30pm-1:30pm, Albany 218
    Identity & Belonging : Student Research Panel
    • Naomi Goldman-Nagel CAS ’19, “Monologues From a Girl with a Multifaceted Identity.”
    • Lindsey Clark CAS ’18, “The Arab Spring ‘Success’ Case: Challenges to Tunisia’s      
      Democratic Transition.”
    • Noam Margalit CAS ’18, “A Society Built on Death’: Examining the Presence and
      Absence of Dying in Israel.”  

     

    4:30-5:30pm, Howard 102

    “Explaining Women’s Electability: Role Congruity and the Importance of Candidate Type”
    Dr. Lindsay Benstead, Portland State University Professor of Political Science and Interim Director of the Middle East Studies Center (MESC)

    Presentation abstract: Ensuring female representation has been at the forefront of the global development agenda. Yet, little is known about which traits or social, economic, or political roles make women more electable. When and why do voters cast ballots for women, and how can insights into this help scholars, policymakers, and development specialists have a clearer understanding of the prospects of increasing women’s roles? Gender role congruity theory argues that bias against females for leadership roles stems from a mismatch between stereotyped gender roles and the traits associated with a “good leader.” We extend this theory by arguing that the credentials that candidates emphasize, such as their success as business entrepreneurs or civil society activists, has a significant influence on the extent to which voters prefer male over female voters because candidates are also judged as effective occupants of these roles when considered as future political leaders. Drawing on data from four original survey experiments conducted in Tunisia, Egypt, and Jordan between 2012 and 2014, we show that electability varies according to the skills candidates bring to the job. In the survey experiment, respondents were presented at random with brief descriptions of candidates who were either male or female and engaged in civil society work or business. We find strong and consistent evidence across the four countries that voters prefer business candidates to civil society candidates. Moreover, males in particular prefer male candidates to female candidates. But, the gender gap in electability is larger for business candidates – roles for which women are often stereotyped as unfit – than civil society candidates. When male and female candidates are running on civil society platforms, the gender bias at the polls is narrowed. We argue that this is because many view women as caring and community-oriented, and thus as having the traits that many equate with successful civil society activists.

     

    6pm, Stamm
    Musical Performance by the Al Andalus Ensemble 
    Al-Andalus Ensemble an award winning musical ensemble that performs both traditional Andalusian music and contemporary work.  It is internationally known for its innovative fusion of Middle Eastern, North African, European and American traditions, which it represents through world, jazz, flamenco and classical music. The group’s spectrum of work includes original Nuevo-Andalusian and jazz pieces to stirring renditions of American spirituals to thrilling, improvised percussion solos played on traditional clay drums, and much more.

  • Image preview All Day: 4th Annual Middle East Symposium

    Monday February 19th


    6pm-7pm,  Howard 102
    Keynote Presentation - Dr. Omar Reda, OHSU
    Dr. Reda a Libyan-American doctor specializing in forensic psychiatrist and teaches at Oregon Health Sciences University. Reda fled his homeland in 1999 upon receiving threat of arrest by Ghaddafi’s forces for delivering food and supplies to families of those imprisoned by the regime. Over the past decade, Reda has frequently returned to Libya to help those affected by conflict and has worked to create programs to help children recover emotionally from experiences of trauma.  

     

    7:15-8:30pm, Smith Hall
    Symposium Dinner Banquet
    Members of the Lewis & Clark Community are invited to attend a dinner banquet for all symposium presenters, organizers, and guests. This gathering is an opportunity to interact with presenters and recognize the efforts of the steering committee. This event is catered by Ya-Hala Lebanese Cuisine. 

     


    Tuesday February 20th 


     

    2pm-3pm, Location TBA
    The ‘Cyprus Conflict’: The Experiences of a Fulbright-Hayes Participant on an Island Divided
    Omeica Hudson, Department of Education Fulbright-Hayes Participant
    Presentation Abstract: ”Cyprus is an island off the coast of Turkey that has had multiple civil wars between ethnicities over political power sharing. These wars led to UN peacekeeping troops helping to create a ceasefire in 1974 that is still in effect today. This conflict has been termed the “Cyprus Conflict”.

    The wars split Cyprus into two nations based on ethnicity: the southern, Greek (The Republic of Cyprus) and the northern, Turkish,( Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus) There is a “UN Buffer Zone” called the “Green Line” that stretches 112 miles from north to south and is about 4 miles wide at its widest point. Most of the buffer zone is a graveyard and time capsule of lost lives, land, homes, and histories and is now patrolled by UN peacekeeping troops and border patrols. At one point, the “Green Line” runs through the center of the capital city, Nicosia, the only divided capital city in the world. The village of Pyla, located inside the “Green Line”, is the only village in Cyprus where Greeks and Turks communities live and govern together.

    Although there is a ceasefire between these two segregated nations, Cyprus has technically been at war for the last 43 years. UN sponsored negotiation talks have been held many times over the last 43 years without success. The last negotiations were in the works this summer. As I lived among those hoping for progress towards reunification through an equitable bi-communal, bi-zonal federation, there was a palpable sense of loss and frustration when the news broke in July that the UN-sponsored talks ended without



    any resolution.”


     

    4pm-5pm, Albany 218
    “Collective Amnesia: The Multi-Cultural Contributions of Al-Andalus to Western Civilization”
    Dr. Julia Bazi, Lewis & Clark Professor of Music 
    Presentation abstract:  For almost 800 years, Al Andalus fostered an enlightened culture in which three great Abrahamic traditions — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — co-existed, interacted, and flourished. During the time of Al Andalus (711-1492), individuals of different ethnicities and faiths created an advanced and thriving culture which has had a lasting effect on world culture. So much of what we know and employ today dates back to this period. Modern-day science, technology, math, astronomy, medicine, music, agriculture, architecture, art and even clothing and dining etiquette can all find their roots centuries earlier in Islamic Spain. And yet, this is not a history with which many of us are familiar.The capacity of a memory to endure depends on the social power of the group that holds it and records that history. Collective memory implies by extension, the concept of collective forgetting. This phenomena has its own history. This presentation explores how older Iberian memories continue to influence our present and how the period of Al Andalus, often entirely ignored in our Western History books has had, and continues to have far reaching consequences in the present.


    5:30-6:30pm, Albany 218

    Morocco Student Research Panel
    Moderator: 
    Dr. Oren Kosansky, Lewis & Clark Professor of Sociology & Anthropology and Director of the Middle East & North African Studies (MENA) Minor. 
    • Bradley Davis CAS ’18, “Philosophy and the Islamic Republic”
    • Emily Hayes-Rich CAS ’19, “The Moroccan Khettara: State Influences Over Rural, Desert
      Morocco from the 7th Century to the Present.” 


    7pm-8pm, Howard 102

    Film Screening: White Helmets 

    This 2016 documentary, set in Aleppo follows the daily operations of volunteer rescue workers known as the White Helmets as they work to save civilians affected by Syria’s civil war. A short discussion will follow the screening. Pizza will be provided at this event. 


     


    Wednesday February 19th 


     


    12:30pm-1:30pm, Albany 218
    Identity & Belonging : Student Research Panel
    • Naomi Goldman-Nagel CAS ’19, “Monologues From a Girl with a Multifaceted Identity.”
    • Lindsey Clark CAS ’18, “The Arab Spring ‘Success’ Case: Challenges to Tunisia’s      
      Democratic Transition.”
    • Noam Margalit CAS ’18, “A Society Built on Death’: Examining the Presence and
      Absence of Dying in Israel.”  

     

    4:30-5:30pm, Howard 102

    “Explaining Women’s Electability: Role Congruity and the Importance of Candidate Type”
    Dr. Lindsay Benstead, Portland State University Professor of Political Science and Interim Director of the Middle East Studies Center (MESC)

    Presentation abstract: Ensuring female representation has been at the forefront of the global development agenda. Yet, little is known about which traits or social, economic, or political roles make women more electable. When and why do voters cast ballots for women, and how can insights into this help scholars, policymakers, and development specialists have a clearer understanding of the prospects of increasing women’s roles? Gender role congruity theory argues that bias against females for leadership roles stems from a mismatch between stereotyped gender roles and the traits associated with a “good leader.” We extend this theory by arguing that the credentials that candidates emphasize, such as their success as business entrepreneurs or civil society activists, has a significant influence on the extent to which voters prefer male over female voters because candidates are also judged as effective occupants of these roles when considered as future political leaders. Drawing on data from four original survey experiments conducted in Tunisia, Egypt, and Jordan between 2012 and 2014, we show that electability varies according to the skills candidates bring to the job. In the survey experiment, respondents were presented at random with brief descriptions of candidates who were either male or female and engaged in civil society work or business. We find strong and consistent evidence across the four countries that voters prefer business candidates to civil society candidates. Moreover, males in particular prefer male candidates to female candidates. But, the gender gap in electability is larger for business candidates – roles for which women are often stereotyped as unfit – than civil society candidates. When male and female candidates are running on civil society platforms, the gender bias at the polls is narrowed. We argue that this is because many view women as caring and community-oriented, and thus as having the traits that many equate with successful civil society activists.

     

    6pm, Stamm
    Musical Performance by the Al Andalus Ensemble 
    Al-Andalus Ensemble an award winning musical ensemble that performs both traditional Andalusian music and contemporary work.  It is internationally known for its innovative fusion of Middle Eastern, North African, European and American traditions, which it represents through world, jazz, flamenco and classical music. The group’s spectrum of work includes original Nuevo-Andalusian and jazz pieces to stirring renditions of American spirituals to thrilling, improvised percussion solos played on traditional clay drums, and much more.

    until February 23
  • Image preview All Day: Wanted: Volunteers for International Fair
    Wanted: Volunteers for International Fair

    Please contact the respective regional representative for more information!

    The International Fair is on Saturday, March 3rd in the Bon, Stamm, and the Chapel
  • Image preview 9:00am - 4:00pm: ON SALE NOW – Tickets for L&C Night at the Portland Trail Blazers

    TICKETS ARE ON SALE NOW!

    Lewis & Clark Night at the Portland Trail Blazers
    Portland Trail Blazers vs. Memphis Grizzlies
    Sunday, April 1st, 6pm @ The Moda Center



    Purchase your tickets now for only $5 (regularly $17) from Student Activities – cash, check, credit/debit accepted! Tickets are available Monday through Friday, 9am to 4pm in the Student Activities office (Templeton 258 - right next to the Council Chamber).

    Attendees are responsible for their own transportation to and from the Moda Center.

  • Image preview 4:30pm - 7:30pm: Girl Scout Cookie Sales
    Girl Scout Cookie Season is here!

    Stop by the table outside the Bon and purchase Girl Scout Cookies from area Girl Scout Troops.

February 23rd, 2018

  • Image preview All Day: 4th Annual Middle East Symposium

    Monday February 19th


    6pm-7pm,  Howard 102
    Keynote Presentation - Dr. Omar Reda, OHSU
    Dr. Reda a Libyan-American doctor specializing in forensic psychiatrist and teaches at Oregon Health Sciences University. Reda fled his homeland in 1999 upon receiving threat of arrest by Ghaddafi’s forces for delivering food and supplies to families of those imprisoned by the regime. Over the past decade, Reda has frequently returned to Libya to help those affected by conflict and has worked to create programs to help children recover emotionally from experiences of trauma.  

     

    7:15-8:30pm, Smith Hall
    Symposium Dinner Banquet
    Members of the Lewis & Clark Community are invited to attend a dinner banquet for all symposium presenters, organizers, and guests. This gathering is an opportunity to interact with presenters and recognize the efforts of the steering committee. This event is catered by Ya-Hala Lebanese Cuisine. 

     


    Tuesday February 20th 


     

    2pm-3pm, Location TBA
    The ‘Cyprus Conflict’: The Experiences of a Fulbright-Hayes Participant on an Island Divided
    Omeica Hudson, Department of Education Fulbright-Hayes Participant
    Presentation Abstract: ”Cyprus is an island off the coast of Turkey that has had multiple civil wars between ethnicities over political power sharing. These wars led to UN peacekeeping troops helping to create a ceasefire in 1974 that is still in effect today. This conflict has been termed the “Cyprus Conflict”.

    The wars split Cyprus into two nations based on ethnicity: the southern, Greek (The Republic of Cyprus) and the northern, Turkish,( Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus) There is a “UN Buffer Zone” called the “Green Line” that stretches 112 miles from north to south and is about 4 miles wide at its widest point. Most of the buffer zone is a graveyard and time capsule of lost lives, land, homes, and histories and is now patrolled by UN peacekeeping troops and border patrols. At one point, the “Green Line” runs through the center of the capital city, Nicosia, the only divided capital city in the world. The village of Pyla, located inside the “Green Line”, is the only village in Cyprus where Greeks and Turks communities live and govern together.

    Although there is a ceasefire between these two segregated nations, Cyprus has technically been at war for the last 43 years. UN sponsored negotiation talks have been held many times over the last 43 years without success. The last negotiations were in the works this summer. As I lived among those hoping for progress towards reunification through an equitable bi-communal, bi-zonal federation, there was a palpable sense of loss and frustration when the news broke in July that the UN-sponsored talks ended without



    any resolution.”


     

    4pm-5pm, Albany 218
    “Collective Amnesia: The Multi-Cultural Contributions of Al-Andalus to Western Civilization”
    Dr. Julia Bazi, Lewis & Clark Professor of Music 
    Presentation abstract:  For almost 800 years, Al Andalus fostered an enlightened culture in which three great Abrahamic traditions — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — co-existed, interacted, and flourished. During the time of Al Andalus (711-1492), individuals of different ethnicities and faiths created an advanced and thriving culture which has had a lasting effect on world culture. So much of what we know and employ today dates back to this period. Modern-day science, technology, math, astronomy, medicine, music, agriculture, architecture, art and even clothing and dining etiquette can all find their roots centuries earlier in Islamic Spain. And yet, this is not a history with which many of us are familiar.The capacity of a memory to endure depends on the social power of the group that holds it and records that history. Collective memory implies by extension, the concept of collective forgetting. This phenomena has its own history. This presentation explores how older Iberian memories continue to influence our present and how the period of Al Andalus, often entirely ignored in our Western History books has had, and continues to have far reaching consequences in the present.


    5:30-6:30pm, Albany 218

    Morocco Student Research Panel
    Moderator: 
    Dr. Oren Kosansky, Lewis & Clark Professor of Sociology & Anthropology and Director of the Middle East & North African Studies (MENA) Minor. 
    • Bradley Davis CAS ’18, “Philosophy and the Islamic Republic”
    • Emily Hayes-Rich CAS ’19, “The Moroccan Khettara: State Influences Over Rural, Desert
      Morocco from the 7th Century to the Present.” 


    7pm-8pm, Howard 102

    Film Screening: White Helmets 

    This 2016 documentary, set in Aleppo follows the daily operations of volunteer rescue workers known as the White Helmets as they work to save civilians affected by Syria’s civil war. A short discussion will follow the screening. Pizza will be provided at this event. 


     


    Wednesday February 19th 


     


    12:30pm-1:30pm, Albany 218
    Identity & Belonging : Student Research Panel
    • Naomi Goldman-Nagel CAS ’19, “Monologues From a Girl with a Multifaceted Identity.”
    • Lindsey Clark CAS ’18, “The Arab Spring ‘Success’ Case: Challenges to Tunisia’s      
      Democratic Transition.”
    • Noam Margalit CAS ’18, “A Society Built on Death’: Examining the Presence and
      Absence of Dying in Israel.”  

     

    4:30-5:30pm, Howard 102

    “Explaining Women’s Electability: Role Congruity and the Importance of Candidate Type”
    Dr. Lindsay Benstead, Portland State University Professor of Political Science and Interim Director of the Middle East Studies Center (MESC)

    Presentation abstract: Ensuring female representation has been at the forefront of the global development agenda. Yet, little is known about which traits or social, economic, or political roles make women more electable. When and why do voters cast ballots for women, and how can insights into this help scholars, policymakers, and development specialists have a clearer understanding of the prospects of increasing women’s roles? Gender role congruity theory argues that bias against females for leadership roles stems from a mismatch between stereotyped gender roles and the traits associated with a “good leader.” We extend this theory by arguing that the credentials that candidates emphasize, such as their success as business entrepreneurs or civil society activists, has a significant influence on the extent to which voters prefer male over female voters because candidates are also judged as effective occupants of these roles when considered as future political leaders. Drawing on data from four original survey experiments conducted in Tunisia, Egypt, and Jordan between 2012 and 2014, we show that electability varies according to the skills candidates bring to the job. In the survey experiment, respondents were presented at random with brief descriptions of candidates who were either male or female and engaged in civil society work or business. We find strong and consistent evidence across the four countries that voters prefer business candidates to civil society candidates. Moreover, males in particular prefer male candidates to female candidates. But, the gender gap in electability is larger for business candidates – roles for which women are often stereotyped as unfit – than civil society candidates. When male and female candidates are running on civil society platforms, the gender bias at the polls is narrowed. We argue that this is because many view women as caring and community-oriented, and thus as having the traits that many equate with successful civil society activists.

     

    6pm, Stamm
    Musical Performance by the Al Andalus Ensemble 
    Al-Andalus Ensemble an award winning musical ensemble that performs both traditional Andalusian music and contemporary work.  It is internationally known for its innovative fusion of Middle Eastern, North African, European and American traditions, which it represents through world, jazz, flamenco and classical music. The group’s spectrum of work includes original Nuevo-Andalusian and jazz pieces to stirring renditions of American spirituals to thrilling, improvised percussion solos played on traditional clay drums, and much more.

  • Image preview 7:00pm - 8:30pm: Call for Poetry Submissions – World Language Poetry Night
    Call for Submissions!
    World Language Poetry Night

    Theme: Beyond the wall - breaking down cultural stereotypes
    Submissions may be in English or your home language
    Poems may be written by you or your favorite poet

    Selected individuals will present their poems on Tuesday, February 27th from 7pm to 8:30pm.
  • Image preview 7:00pm: Coco
    Campus Activities Board presents…

    Coco
    Friday, February 23rd @ 7pm – Council Chamber

    Aspiring musician Miguel, confronted with his family’s ancestral ban on music, enters the Land of the Dead to find his great-great-grandfather, a legendary singer.

    Anthony Gonzalez, Gael García Bernal, Benjamin Bratt, Alanna Ubach, Renee Victor; Directed by Lee Unkrich; Walt Disney Pictures; Rating PG; 109 minutes; 2017

February 25th, 2018

  • Image preview 10:30am - 1:30pm: Girl Scout Cookie Sales
    Girl Scout Cookie Season is here!

    Stop by the table outside the Bon and purchase Girl Scout Cookies from area Girl Scout Troops.

February 26th, 2018

  • Image preview 7:00pm - 8:30pm: Call for Poetry Submissions – World Language Poetry Night
    Call for Submissions!
    World Language Poetry Night

    Theme: Beyond the wall - breaking down cultural stereotypes
    Submissions may be in English or your home language
    Poems may be written by you or your favorite poet

    Selected individuals will present their poems on Tuesday, February 27th from 7pm to 8:30pm.

February 27th, 2018

  • Image preview 9:00am - 4:00pm: ON SALE NOW – Tickets for L&C Night at the Portland Trail Blazers

    TICKETS ARE ON SALE NOW!

    Lewis & Clark Night at the Portland Trail Blazers
    Portland Trail Blazers vs. Memphis Grizzlies
    Sunday, April 1st, 6pm @ The Moda Center



    Purchase your tickets now for only $5 (regularly $17) from Student Activities – cash, check, credit/debit accepted! Tickets are available Monday through Friday, 9am to 4pm in the Student Activities office (Templeton 258 - right next to the Council Chamber).

    Attendees are responsible for their own transportation to and from the Moda Center.

February 28th, 2018

  • Image preview 4:30pm - 7:30pm: Girl Scout Cookie Sales
    Girl Scout Cookie Season is here!

    Stop by the table outside the Bon and purchase Girl Scout Cookies from area Girl Scout Troops.

March 1st, 2018

  • Image preview All Day: Wanted: Volunteers for International Fair
    Wanted: Volunteers for International Fair

    Please contact the respective regional representative for more information!

    The International Fair is on Saturday, March 3rd in the Bon, Stamm, and the Chapel
  • Image preview 9:00am - 4:00pm: ON SALE NOW – Tickets for L&C Night at the Portland Trail Blazers

    TICKETS ARE ON SALE NOW!

    Lewis & Clark Night at the Portland Trail Blazers
    Portland Trail Blazers vs. Memphis Grizzlies
    Sunday, April 1st, 6pm @ The Moda Center



    Purchase your tickets now for only $5 (regularly $17) from Student Activities – cash, check, credit/debit accepted! Tickets are available Monday through Friday, 9am to 4pm in the Student Activities office (Templeton 258 - right next to the Council Chamber).

    Attendees are responsible for their own transportation to and from the Moda Center.

March 2nd, 2018

March 4th, 2018

  • Image preview 10:30am - 1:30pm: Girl Scout Cookie Sales
    Girl Scout Cookie Season is here!

    Stop by the table outside the Bon and purchase Girl Scout Cookies from area Girl Scout Troops.

March 5th, 2018

  • Image preview 10:30am - 2:00pm: Girl Scout Cookie Sales
    Girl Scout Cookie Season is here!

    Stop by the table outside the Bon and purchase Girl Scout Cookies from area Girl Scout Troops.

News

  • Image preview
    September 28
    Actor Usman Ally transforms scholarly insight into compelling characters.
  • Image preview
    May 29
    In Botswana, Jack Swenson B.A. ’79 and his photo-safari guests conceal themselves in an underground blind, observing doves and impala at a nearby watering hole.
  • Image preview
    May 27
    Jocelyn Stokes B.A. ’07 launched the Survival of the Sun Bears awareness campaign and documentary film project through her media company, Wild & Stoked Productions.
  • Image preview
    February 13
    As the sun began to set on a balmy summer day in Southern California, an Electra cruise ship motored past luxury yachts, sailboats, and multimillion-dollar homes in Newport Harbor. On deck, a wedding ceremony was in progress. Philip Bradley B.S. ’59 pronounced the happy couple husband and wife, smiling as they sealed their union with a kiss.
  • Image preview
    February 12
    Nestled in a rustic campground at the Omega Institute for Holistic Studies in New York state, Susan Kirtley B.A. ’95 fiddled with her tape recorder. The hot, still air seemed to magnify her nervousness as she sat down to interview noted comic artist Lynda Barry.
  • Image preview
    December 5
    Nena Baker B.A. ‘81 writes an eye-opening book on the implications of chemical contaminants accumulating in our bodies.
    by Barbara Schuetze
  • Image preview
    October 22
    After four decades, Rocky Blumhagen returned to the Lewis & Clark stage in June. Partnering with Susannah Mars and the Portland Chamber Orchestra, under the direction of Maestro Yaki Bergman, he performed his latest fundraising revue, “Oh, Those Gershwin Boys!”
  • Image preview
    October 22
    When Barack Obama made his first presidential visit to Israel, Stephanie Beechem B.A. ’08 worked with Obama’s speechwriters and policy staff to help fact-check the president’s remarks.
  • Image preview
    May 29
    On a summer day in 2007, Bjorn Hinrichs B.A. ’94 and his 3-year-old son, Sawyer, were exploring the front yard of their Lake Oswego, Oregon, home—digging in the dirt, turning over rocks, and inspecting bugs. A noisy bird with a red head and fluffy red chest flew in and landed. Sawyer was captivated—and curious.
  • Image preview
    May 29
    When Christy Hale’s B.A. ’77, M.A.T. ’80 daughter was a baby, she remembers watching her make brightly colored pyramids out of stacking rings. “Turned upside down, the stack of rings resembled Frank Lloyd Wright’s design for the Guggenheim Museum in New York City,” thought Hale.
  • Image preview
    May 29
    In the fall of 1962, senior Myrna Ann Adkins B.A. ’63 and about 20 Lewis & Clark students climbed aboard the S.S. President Cleveland headed to Japan for a semester of cultural immersion and study.
  • Image preview
    February 13
    Andrew Bradburn B.A. ’85, Tessa Idlewine B.A. ’09, and Brian Drischell B.A. ’93: Crowds roar and cheer as celebrities walk the red carpet outside Dolby Theatre in Hollywood. Cameras click staccato style and flashbulbs dazzle as reporters wrangle movie stars for live interviews at the annual Academy Awards ceremony.
  • Image preview
    October 4
    Under the stone arches of Sant’Eufemia, a 12th-century church in Spoleto, Italy, Grant Herreid took up his lute. His fingers moved deftly across the strings, plucking a melody line that may have been familiar to the church’s first parishioners.
  • Image preview
    October 4
    Matt Wuerker B.A. ’79 won the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning in recognition of “his consistently fresh, funny cartoons, especially memorable for lampooning the partisan conflict that engulfs Washington.”
  • Image preview
    June 5
    Patrick Fleming B.S. ’92, Brannon Riceci B.S. ’92, and Tim Parsons B.A. ’91 create interesting one-bowl meals with exotic flavors at Boke Bowl.
  • Image preview
    June 5
    Strolling through the streets and gardens of Tokyo, Chico Hayasaki stops to notice the silhouettes of flowering trees and a pink-orange cloud floating above the setting sun.
  • Image preview
    September 8
    Whenever Marc Casto B.A. ’97 travels, one of his first goals is to find a good local cookbook
  • Image preview
    September 25
    “The face of Anchorage is changing,” says Elizabeth “Liz” Posey B.A. ’03, president of the Anchorage Urban League Young Professionals. Nearly 120 languages are spoken in the Anchorage School District. Diverse cultures–including Hmong, Lao, Samoan, Tongan, Dominican, African American, Alaska Native, and Sudanese–continue to grow in representation as word of the city’s acceptance and opportunity gets out.
  • Image preview
    May 1
    Like many children, Grace Gifford ’12 learned to swim at the Y. But for her, getting in the pool was much more than a simple rite of passage.
  • February 5
    Waugh has created more than 100,000 captivating images of water in flight–on purpose–using ultra-highspeed digital cameras and self-designed timing and flash devices.
  • February 5
    For someone who holds a prestigious appointment at a premier cancer research center, Brad Cairns spends a lot of time staring at zebra fish.
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