Chronicle Magazine

Featured Stories

Family Business

Ever Carradine ’96 came to Lewis & Clark to find her own path. In the end, her footsteps led back to the footlights of the family trade.

Lewis & Clark’s Big Cheese

Brandon Wiebe is the founder and president of the Lewis & Clark College Cheese Club, which hosts biannual tasting soirees that draw upwards of 100 attendees in search of cheese snacks and enlightenment. Last spring, Wiebe and a dedicated cadre of campus cheese aficionados organized the first-ever Pacific Northwest Symposium on Cheese, held at the College.

The Lewis & Clark Wine Trail

Starting from campus, the vinous adventurer can travel in just about any direction to discover a winery that is owned, operated, or staffed by a graduate of Lewis & Clark College.

Gender Studies Writ Large

Lewis & Clark’s Gender Studies Symposium celebrates 25 years of inquiry, activism, and leadership.

Alumni News

Around the World in 8 Days

During eight days in March, President Tom Hochstettler, Board Chair John Bates, and Director of International Student Services Greg Caldwell traveled to London, Abu Dhabi, and Hong Kong, visiting some 120 faculty, students, alumni, parents, donors, and Lewis & Clark friends, as well as colleagues in education, business, and government.

Profiles

Saving the Farm

Delusional optimists. That’s the moniker opposing counsel gave Brenna Bell ’97, JD ’01 and her band of grassroots organizers from Tryon Life Community Farm, a nonprofit organization dedicated to sustainability education.

Into Africa

Niels Marquardt ’75 has traveled the world as a career officer with the U.S. Foreign Service and currently serves as ambassador to Cameroon and neighboring Equatorial Guinea in western Africa.

Former International Student Adviser Mourned

Mary Dimond, former international student adviser at Lewis & Clark

The Poet-Teacher

Rita Ott Ramstad MAT. ‘98 channeled her emotions into “A Wish for My Children,” the last poem in her autobiographical collection The Play of Light and Dark, for which she won the 2003 Oregon Book Award.

Carving Out a Legacy

Perched on a stool in his home-based shop, Don Floren ‘53 grips a surgically sharp carving tool and begins shaping a large block of Oregon alder. Faced with the diminishing availability of Honduras mahogany, his quintessential favorite material, Floren has adopted alder–an abundant local wood that carves and finishes nicely.