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Class Notes

Class of 1950

  • The Honorable Anthony “Tony” L. Casciato died of congestive heart failure September 7, 2015. He was 97 years old.

    Tony was born on November 1, 1917, in Portland. He and his twin brother, Alfredo (who died in infancy), were the fifth and sixth children of Giuseppe and Teresina Casciato. Tony graduated from Commerce (later Cleveland) High School. He attended Multnomah College and the University of Portland, graduating from the latter in 1941. Tony worked for the Bonneville Power Administration until he was drafted in 1942. Following his return from service during World War II, he studied law.

    In 1950, Tony married Dolores “Dede” Carlo. They had four children.

    Admitted to the bar in 1951, Tony practiced law until 1971, when he was appointed to the municipal bench (later the District/Circuit Court) for Multnomah County. He retired in 1993.

    Love of family, friends, the law, and sports characterized Tony’s life. A quintessential family man, he instilled in his children a sense of fair play, a love of learning, a ferocious work ethic, and an abiding loyalty to family and friends. His love for his old neighborhood of South Portland and its denizens never left him and to the very end, nothing made him happier than recounting stories from his youth. He considered the law a noble profession and saw it as a tool for helping others. Sports, particularly baseball, were both a passion and a solace. A gifted athlete, he played semi-pro baseball in his youth and never lost his love for the game or his favorite team, the New York Yankees. One of the greatest experiences of his life was attending the Yankees fantasy baseball camp at the age of 82 with his son Peter. He was a devoted member of the Multnomah Athletic Club, where he played squash for many years.

    Although he could be somewhat reserved, Tony enjoyed the company of others. He was particularly good with very young children, entering into their lives and interests with enthusiasm and gusto. To older children and young adults, he was an approachable father figure, someone who could offer thoughtful advice and sympathetic understanding. In his professional capacity he was a mentor and guide to legions of young lawyers, many of whom credit their subsequent success to his wise counsel. Those who were old or sick found in him a sympathetic presence and a ready listener.

    A voracious reader, Tony routinely read the newspaper—paying special attention to the sports coverage—and all the books he could get his hands on. He was particularly fond of history and biography. Art was another favorite activity.

    Tony was preceded in death by his wife, Dede, and his son Peter. He is survived by his son Tom; his daughters, Mary Jo Binker and Nancy Casciato; his daughters-in-law, Regina Casciato and Kathleen Hughes; his sons-in-law, Roland Binker and Kenn Walton; six grandchildren; and many devoted relatives and friends.

  • Warren C. Craig ’50, August 6, 2017, age 94. Craig served his country during World War II, earning a Bronze Star. After returning from the war and graduating from Lewis & Clark, he married his wife, Anne, and began his career as an electrician. In retirement, Craig volunteered frequently and was a member of the Tigard (Oregon) Lions Club and Calvin Presbyterian Church. Survivors include his wife of nearly 70 years, Anne; his son, Douglas; and three grandchildren.

  • Margrett L. Devin BA ’50, November 18, 2017, age 89. Soon after graduating from Lewis & Clark, she married Robert Devin. The couple had two sons in 1953 and a daughter in 1964. The family moved extensively around the United States due to Robert’s military service. After her husband’s death in 1990, Devin settled in Apple Valley, California. She loved Shakespeare and language. Survivors include her children, Michael, Steven, and Patricia, and two grandchildren.

  • Marjorie J. Doty BA ’50, August 17, 2017, age 89. After graduating, Doty cofounded Viewcrest Nurseries in Battle Ground, Washington, and played an important managerial role there. At home, she enjoyed gardening and making preserves. Survivors include her husband of 67 years, John; her daughters, Marilyn, Janet, and Barbara; and many loving grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

    • 06/02/2016

      Don Driscoll BA notes that it’s been some “three score and nine years” since his college days first began and “a lot of water has gone under the bridge, or over the dam, if you prefer that phrase.” In 1946, the history department consisted of one professor, namely Dr. Philip Overmeyer, and a few other professors who combined history with other subjects. Today, there are more than 10 faculty members. “My, how much the department has been transformed,” Driscoll writes, “and I’m sure that it has all been for the better.” He modestly adds that he can “offer little in the way of accomplishments or achievements other than the gratitude of having been married for the past 63-plus years to a wonderful spouse, Eva Driscoll, a fellow 1950 Lewis & Clark graduate.”

  • Marie S. McMillan BA ’50, July 2, 2017, age 89. McMillan met her husband, Richard, while at Lewis & Clark, and they were married in 1949. The couple moved to Cleveland, where McMillan worked as a librarian. They had two children. McMillan was a deacon and active member of her church, as well as a member of the church choir. She enjoyed playing bridge and exercising with friends. Survivors include her children, Kathy and Brad, and five grandchildren.

    • 10/14/2016

      Lucille Rieben BA ’50 taught for a year after her graduation from Lewis & Clark, then attended the San Francisco Theological Seminary, where she graduated in 1957. For a number of years, she traveled the Midwest and Southwest for the Board of Christian Education of the Presbyterian Church USA. She was director of education for a church in St. Louis, and then in Kansas City, Missouri, and finally served in a national position in women’s ministries with the National Presbyterian Church in San Francisco before retiring in 1992. She now lives in Portland.

  • Patricia Barnard Stipe BA ’50, August 13, 2016, age 89. Patricia worked in the Swan Island shipyards, contributing to the war effort. When the war ended, she married Tom Stipe. After a stint in New York City, the couple returned to Portland, where Patricia opened a children’s clothing store in Lake Oswego. The couple raised three children and lived in Eastmoreland for more than 50 years. Patricia enjoyed playing the piano and was active with the Oregon Symphony, the First Unitarian Church, and the Eastmoreland Garden Club. Survivors include her three children, Bob, Paul, and Anne, as well as three grandchildren.

    • 09/29/2017

      George Thompson BA ’50 celebrated his 90th birthday in summer 2017. Thompson had a long career as a music teacher and guidance counselor in Dallas, Oregon. After his retirement, the Dallas Education Association created the George Thompson Dallas Education Association Award, which he presents each spring.