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In Memoriam

From 1980 to 1989

    • 01/03/2020

      Craig C. Gibson BM ’81, January 3, 2020, age 60.

    • 08/17/2016

      William “Sam” S. Simpson JD ’81 of Otsego, Michigan, passed away June 9, 2015. He was 68 years old.

      Sam was born February 7, 1947, to Florence and Ray Simpson. He graduated from Otsego High School with honors and attended Michigan State University, where he met his wife of 43 years, Elaine K. Sheehan.

      After returning to his hometown of Otsego, Sam was employed by Old Kent Bank as a commercial loan documentation officer. He later specialized in wills, trusts, and banking regulations. Sam also served on the Otsego City Commission and helped establish the Otsego Area Historical Society.

      Sam had a lifelong interest in amateur radio; his call sign was KC8OZG. His passions were cooking, the Upper Peninsula, and animal welfare.

    • 07/10/2015

      Richard “Dick” John Whittemore JD ’92 passed away unexpectedly on July 5, 2015, having suffered cardiac arrest following a weekend of racing his BMW 325 in Auburn, Washington. He was 59 years old.

      Dick was born January 19, 1956, in Portland to Dr. James P. and Mary Margaret Whittemore. He attended St. Thomas More Grade School and Jesuit High School, from which he graduated in 1974. He earned a BA cum laude in philosophy from Colorado College in 1978. While a law student, Dick worked nights at Abernethy’s Restaurant so he could serve a clerkship for Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Charles Crookham. He remained close to Crookham and delivered a eulogy at the judge’s funeral service in 2004.

      Dick joined the firm of Bullivant Houser Bailey in 1984 and was a senior shareholder. An expert in product liability defense, clergy malpractice, medical malpractice, and commercial litigation, he was a member of the Oregon, Washington, and Idaho bar associations and practiced law for more than 30 years. “Dick was the consummate professional and partner and a tremendous legal advocate equally respected by his clients, adversaries, and judges hearing his cases,” said Loren Podwill, president of Bullivant Houser Bailey. “He was a devoted teacher, spending endless hours working with newer lawyers, teaching them the tools of the trade and professionalism, and volunteering his time to judge local and national legal competitions. Dick carried himself through the world with confidence, grace, and dignity.” He had a reputation for speaking softly, listening intently, and thinking logically.

      Dick had a deep respect for the law, but his personal passion was motor racing. He traveled the Pacific Northwest participating in Sports Car Club of America races and collected numerous checkered flags throughout his racing career.

      In 1997, Dick was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) and underwent six months of aggressive treatment. During this time, his dedication to his clients and his firm never wavered, and he continued to work at a high level. In 2008, Dick was diagnosed with a more aggressive form of NHL, but he succeeded in surviving both the formidable treatment and the disease with quiet strength.

      Dick was a member of numerous professional organizations, including the American Board of Trial Advocates, which he served as national board representative president-elect. He was a member of the Oregon Association of Defense Counsel and served as a regional judge for the 2015 National Trial Competition of the Texas Young Lawyers Association. He was also a member of the Multnomah Athletic Club and the University Club of Portland, which he served as president in 2006.

      Dick is survived by his loving wife of 10 years, Carolyn; sisters Kathy Johnson and Susan Honeyman; brother James Whittemore; nieces Libby Rasmussen and Katherine Byrne; and nephews Blake Whittemore, Michael Johnson, Christopher Johnson, Andrew Honeyman, and Kevin Honeyman.

    • 12/04/2015

      Julie A. Keil JD ’83 passed away November 24, 2015.

      Julie received a bachelor’s degree in history from the University of Minnesota. After earning her JD, she worked for Portland General Electric Company for 20 years. Julie was responsible for the license and water rights issues surrounding PGE’s five Federal Energy Regulatory Commission-licensed hydropower projects. She joined GEI Consultants in February 2015 as a senior consultant.

      Julie served as president of the National Hydropower Association from 1997 to 1998 and of the Northwest Hydroelectric Association. Most recently, she was chair of the Low Impact Hydropower Institute. Over the course of her career, she testified before four congressional committees regarding the need to reform the relicensing process for hydropower projects. She also served on the federal advisory committee for the interagency task force that considered improvements to the licensing process. In 2003, she received the industry’s highest honor, the Dr. Kenneth Henwood Award.

    • 01/10/2020

      Edward Murray Collins JD ’84 died unexpectedly following a cardiac event on December 12, 2019. He was 64 years old.

      The first child of Samuel and Dorothy Collins, Ed was born in Rockland, Maine, on June 12, 1955. After he earned a BA in environmental studies from George Washington University, he worked for Maine Congressional Representative David F. Emery in Rockland and Washington, D.C., as a legislative assistant focusing on environmental and marine matters.

      Ed became a member of the Maine Bar in 1984 and began practicing in Rockland in 1985, when he joined his father at the firm currently known as Hanscom and Collins, PA. He was active with the nonprofits North Haven Foundation, North Haven Development Corporation, Megunticook Watershed Association, and St. George Community Sailing, and was on the boards of the Farnsworth Art Museum, the Camden Public Library, the Georges River Land Trust, and the Mid-Coast Mental Health Association. Ed was also president of the Rockland Cemetery Association and a board member of the MCH Neighbor Foundation and the Center for Maine Contemporary Arts. He was president of the Knox County Bar Association and a member of the Maine Bar Association.

      Ed loved being outside and especially enjoyed canoeing, kayaking, water-skiing, snow skiing, and gardening. He shared this love of the outdoors with his children, family, and friends. He also loved a good debate. A great cook, Ed worked hard to create the perfect loaf of French bread.

      Ed is survived by his partner, Susan Trenholm; his children, Jane R. Collins, S. Wilson Collins, Abigail E. Goodridge, and Emma M. Collins; his sisters, Elizabeth Collins Macomber and Diane Collins Field; his aunt Barbara Lebel; and many nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends.

    • 02/22/2019

      Audrey Underdahl ’84, September 20, 2018, age 85. She married Kenneth in 1952 and they shared 57 years together. She worked as a teacher in Lake Oswego, Oregon, and she loved to ski, bike, hike, and play tennis. Survivors include her children, Sally, Dana, Louise, Gretchen, Randi, and Rees; 17 grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

    • 12/01/2017

      Norman David Malbin JD ’85 died of heart failure on October 1, 2017, at the age of 68.

      A Portland labor lawyer who served for more than two decades as general counsel for International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 48, Norman was an influential and highly respected figure in the Oregon labor movement. Hundreds of union activists were trained at the annual Oregon Labor Law Conference, which he founded in 1996 and directed until his retirement three years ago. He wrote a pamphlet while still in private practice, explaining wage and hour law in layperson’s language. It is still widely read by workers of all trades who deal with wage theft and other abuses of nonunion contractors.

      Norman inherited a passion for social justice from his parents, both of whom paid a price for their convictions during the McCarthy era. His father, Dr. Morris Malbin, treated workers in Portland’s shipyards during World War II and was instrumental in setting up Kaiser’s pioneering group health insurance plan for union members during and after the war. Dr. Malbin also passed along a passion for sailing to his son, who always joked that he wanted to be a tugboat captain when he grew up.

      Norman studied psychology at the University of Denver, planning to be a child psychologist. He took a series of jobs with nonprofits dealing with youth unemployment and delinquency, but a stint as director of research for the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries sparked an interest in labor law, and he began taking night classes at Lewis & Clark Law School.

      Norman spent three years with two different firms before opening his own office. He served both unions and individual workers without union protection. At IBEW Local 48 Norman provided free legal services at the union hall, where union members could get advice on a wide variety of legal problems. Though he formally retired in 2014, he continued to do work for IBEW. Two of the last projects Norman worked on were union research on job discrimination against women electricians and a grant proposal for FASCETS, a pioneering nonprofit founded by his sister Diane Malbin to educate people about Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and other neurobehavioral conditions.

      Behind Norm’s take-charge personality and booming voice was a caring and sensitive man with a big heart and a wonderful sense of humor. He was skilled at conflict resolution and generous in spirit and deed, extending himself time and again to people needing help. He loved a good argument, not just for the thrill of competition but out of genuine curiosity and confidence that his adversaries had something to teach him. He took pride in the fact that his children were both union members and politically active. He was most in his element sailing the Columbia River and the San Juan Islands, coaching his sons’ soccer teams during their respective middle school years, and gathering with family and friends on the Washougal River. If people were singing, he could be counted on to join in with his deep bass voice.

      Norman is survived by Wendy Temko, his wife of 38 years; sons Ben and Zak; daughter-in-law Nicole; grandchildren Remy and Tessa; two sisters; and a large family of close relationships and deep friendships.

    • 11/21/2018

      Carol Terril-Hanchrow MA ’85, September 15, 2018, age 80. Terril-Hanchrow worked as a family and marriage counselor, therapist, and Hakomi practitioner. Her life took her to a variety of places, including California, Alaska, Oregon, and Arkansas. She also spent time living on the tundra with Native peoples, which gave her insights she would later use in her therapy and counseling work. Survivors include her husband, Jesse; children Erzsi, Stevie, and Tommy; stepchildren Marsha and Eric; and five grandchildren.

    • 02/03/2020

      William P. Harper, Professional Licensure ’87, August 25, 2019, age 79. Harper was a teacher of physical education and health in Oregon and Washington, as well as a sports coach. He later served as principal of a small early elementary school. Survivors include his wife of 53 years, Rose Mary; his children, Kristine and Paul; seven grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.