School navigation

Diversity and Inclusion

Program introduces Native students to college experience

June 28, 2012

  • Summer academy students Olivia Hines, 16, of the Toppenish tribe, and Chance Moyer, 16, of the Bu...
    Summer academy students Olivia Hines, 16, of the Toppenish tribe, and Chance Moyer, 16, of the Burns Paiute tribe. Photo: Katie Currid/The Oregonian

For the second summer, Lewis & Clark welcomed Native American high school students to campus, introducing them to the college experience through a free two-week residential summer program.

The class of 24 included student Jerome Massad, a senior at David Douglas High School with Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs heritage, who has turned a 1.7 GPA into a place on the honor roll during his time in high school.

“I really want to be successful,” Massad told the Oregonian, “so I can get involved and be a positive role model.”

Students attending the Indigenous Ways of Knowing (IWOK) summer academy receive intense SAT preparation as well as an introduction to the liberal arts through a Native lens. Family involvement in the program is strongly encouraged.

 

“It’s about a desire to lead,” said IWOK coordinator Se-ah-dom Edmo. “These are students who are serious about service and their desire to make a difference in their tribes and communities.”

Learn more about the IWOK summer academy in this Oregonian article.

 

Share this story on

Diversity and Inclusion

Contact Us