School navigation

Content tagged with "collaborative research"

News

  • August 1
    After years of specimen collecting, venom milking, and proteomic sequencing, arachnologist and Lewis & Clark Professor of Biology Greta Binford and her team have published evidence to put to rest a longstanding urban legend: the venom of the daddy long-legs spider won’t hurt you. Their research appears in the new issue of Frontiers in Evolution and Ecology.
  • Chemistry Professor Anne Bentley, in the lab with undergrads.
    June 6

    How do you teach an introductory course to a field that is both vast in content and fundamental to understanding inorganic chemistry? Associate Professor of Chemistry Anne Bentley is helping lead an innovative study funded by the National Science Foundation that unites a group of 20 professors and researchers from across the country to develop a groundbreaking inorganic chemistry course.

  • Physics professor Bethe Scaletter with Cyan Cowap BA '19 and James Abney.
    May 13

    Watzek Librarian Parvaneh Abbaspour recently presented new alumna Cyan Cowap BA ’19 with an intriguing opportunity to illustrate the biomedical imaging textbook that Professor of Physics Bethe Scalettar and Lewis & Clark law school alumnus James Abney are writing.

  • Peter Bradley BA '19. Photo by Ben Ritter Photography .
    May 8

    Lewis & Clark has been a top 10 producer of Fulbright scholars in recent years. Peter Bradley BA ’19 has received an English Teaching Fellowship to Argentina and adds to the long list of Lewis & Clark recipients aiming to improve intercultural relations.

  • Diana Leonard
    May 7
    Assistant Professor of Psychology Diana Leonard is working with students in her Emotions and Social Identity in Psychology (ESIP) lab to build upon her intergroup apology research and helping students develop their own research.
  • April 26
    Talia Lichtenberg BA ’20 is the recipient of a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship, the preeminent award for undergraduates in the sciences, engineering, and mathematics. A native of West Linn, Oregon, Talia is majoring in biochemistry and molecular biology with the intent of pursuing a PhD in molecular biology, specializing in Alzheimer’s disease and related neurodegenerative diseases.
  • May 28
    “In my own lab, I have witnessed a powerful impact on students when they look directly into the zebrafish brain for the first time. It opens a window of curiosity that can inspire undergraduate scientists, who will ultimately develop new approaches and become the next generation of cutting-edge researchers,” Weissman writes in Scientific American. Read the whole essay.
  • March 29

    The oldest student-run symposium in the country, Lewis & Clark’s International Affairs Symposium runs April 8 to 10 this year. The event brings prominent scholars from around the globe to debate on the forces challenging the “status quo” worldwide.

  • Glick and colleagues after their first "run" on the BLT.
    February 11
    Lewis & Clark’s high-performance computing (HPC) system has been propelled by a collaborative initiative driven by professors, staff members, and students. Although many are unaware of this HPC system—named BLT for its worker nodes “bacon, lettuce, and tomato”—it is paving the way for current and future research opportunities.
  • Assistant Professor of Biology Norma Velazquez-Ulloa in her lab.
    December 17

    Assistant Professor of Biology Norma Velazquez-Ulloa has been awarded a competitive New Investigator grant from the Medical Research Foundation, funded by OHSU. With the funding, she will continue her research: identifying genes that mediate the effects of developmental nicotine exposure.

  • December 3
    At first glance, chemistry and English have little in common. Yet two courses from these disciplines are now intertwined, thanks to a rare tome acquired in 2014 by Watzek Library’s Special Collections: an illuminated 15th-century book of hours.
  • Sherlock Ortiz BA ’20, Adriana Rogers BA ’19, and Anna Schall BA ’20
    November 8
    After spending the summer working with students and professors from around the country, three Lewis & Clark students return to campus with new skills and perspectives on how to use mathematics to create a solution to partisan gerrymandering. The six-week program is a collaboration of Tufts University, Harvard University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  • October 26
    Health is an issue that impacts us all, yet many struggle to receive adequate health care. In hopes of better understanding these inequities, the 15th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies—titled Bitter Pills: Race, Health, and Medicine—focuses on the racialized dimensions of health, highlighting the voices of communities of color. Running November 7 through November 9, the symposium is free and open to the public.
  • Mae Johnson BA '19 and Sydney Owada BA '19 at the opening reception for their new exhibit.
    September 24
    Two Lewis & Clark seniors have crafted a new Special Collections exhibit to present religious texts spanning 500 years. The students used an interdisciplinary approach to understand the impact that annotation and translation have had on how societies view and engage with Christianity. The final exhibit showcases their efforts in a detailed and nuanced analysis of how religious materials have influenced broader participation.
  • July 26
    Professor of Chemistry Louis Kuo has been awarded a $249,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. The grant will fund Kuo’s ongoing student-supported research into environmental toxin remediation and phosphorus recovery. The research he and his students are doing aims to better degrade neurotoxins found in pesticides and chemical weapons.
  • July 9
    At Lewis & Clark, where students learn science by doing science, collaborative research with professors is an academic hallmark. The John S. Rogers Science Program supports several such projects each summer, and this year included multidisciplinary research with an especially timely goal: create a computer game that will teach users how to act in the aftermath of a natural disaster.
  • July 5
    Watzek Library’s Special Collections has been awarded a $30,100 competitive grant in support of a five-year project to interview members of Portland’s Vietnamese community, collecting oral histories that will document the region’s complex and changing urban landscape.
  • April 18
    Andrea Dean BA ’17 fell in love with mathematics and computer science at Lewis & Clark and is now using her knowledge at Amazon. She’s solving problems in machine learning at a new prototype store. Our Chronicle magazine caught up with her in Seattle for this profile.
  • March 29

    The oldest student-run symposium in the country, Lewis & Clark’s International Affairs Symposium runs April 8 to 10 this year. The event brings prominent scholars from around the globe to debate on the forces challenging the “status quo” worldwide.

  • February 28
    Lewis & Clark’s fifth annual student-run Middle East and North Africa Symposium explores how art and history intersect in the region. Running March 6 through 8, the symposium is free and open to the public.
  • February 28
    Lewis & Clark’s fifth annual student-run Middle East and North Africa Symposium explores how art and history intersect in the region. Running March 6 through 8, the symposium is free and open to the public.
  • Kundai Chirindo, associate professor of rhetoric and media studies, is serving as faculty directo...
    February 26

    From February 28 to March 2, Lewis & Clark will host the fourth annual Pacific Northwest Race, Rhetoric, and Media Symposium. Featuring guest keynotes and student research presentations, this year’s theme is politics in sports and popular culture. The event is a collaboration with the University of Puget Sound, Whitman College, and Willamette University.

  • October 26
    The 15th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies—titled Bitter Pills: Race, Health, and Medicine—focuses on the racialized dimensions of health, highlighting the voices of communities of color. 
  • Simran Handa BA ’19
    October 26
    Healthline, in partnership with the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), has awarded scholarships to four undergraduates nationally who have demonstrated dedication to the advancement against a rare or chronic disease. Handa talks about her win and why she’s drawn to the field.  
  • Symposium cochairs Samuel Stites BA ’18 and Vinaya Bharam BA ’19
    March 27
    Lewis & Clark’s International Affairs Symposium is the oldest student-run symposium in the country. This year’s event, which runs April 9 through 11, will explore current topics intersecting with sovereignty via debates among prominent scholars.
  • February 28

    The 37th annual Gender Studies Symposium will explore what security looks like in the face of modern dangers. Students, faculty, and guests from Portland and beyond will examine issues through the lenses of community engagement, gender politics, and misconceptions surrounding sexuality. The student-run symposium runs from Wednesday, March 7 to Friday, March 9.

  • December 12
    Assistant Professor of Biology Margaret Metz’s research explores how climate and latitude affect the coexistence of tree species in forests around the world. Her recent research on forest diversity in Ecuador is featured in the international science journal Nature.
  • December 8
    Lacey Jacoby BA ’17 (biology and sociology/anthropology) spent the summer of 2017 researching the impacts of microcredit in Cambodia. Her hometown newspaper caught up with Lacey to learn what led her down that research path, and what she plans to do next.
  • November 20
    The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust has recognized Tamily Weissman-Unni, associate professor of biology and cochair of neuroscience, with the 2017 Lynwood W. Swanson Promise for Scientific Research Award.
  • November 13
    The 14th annual Ray Warren Symposium, Legacy: Race and Remembrance, which ran from November 8 to 10, examined the way we view the past, reflect on the stories we tell, and delve into how storytelling can help us imagine a more equitable future.
Share this story on