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September 9th, 2019

  • Mallory Smith 6:00pm: Mallory Smith: A Reading from her Memoir by Diane Smith
    Mallory Smith , who grew up in Los Angeles, was a freelance writer and editor specializing in environmental issues, social justice, and healthcare-related communications. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University and worked as a senior producer at Green Grid Radio, an environmental storytelling radio show and podcast. Her radio work was featured on KCRW, National Radio Project, and State of the Human. She was a fierce advocate for those who suffered from cystic fibrosis, launching the viral social media campaign Lunges4Lungs with friends and raising over $5 million with her parents for CF research through the annual Mallory’s Garden event. She died at the age of twenty-five on November 15, 2017, two months after receiving a double-lung transplant. Mallory’s Legacy Fund has been established in her memory at the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.
    Her mother, Diane Smith, will be reading from this memoir. 

October 9th, 2019

  • Marjorie Welish 6:00pm: A Poetry Reading by Marjorie Welish
    Marjorie Welish  is the author of  The Annotated “Here” and Selected Poems; Word Group; Isle of the Signatories; In the Futurity Lounge / Asylum for Indeterminacy ;  and  So What So That – all from Coffee House Press.  Her honors include the George A. and Eliza Gardner Howard Fellowship from Brown University, the Judith E. Wilson Visiting Poetry Fellowship at Cambridge University, a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation Fellowship, Pollock Krasner Fellowship, and fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts. She has also held a Senior Fulbright Fellowship that has taken her to the University of Frankfurt and to the Edinburgh College of Art. She was the inaugural Madelon Leventhal Rand Distinguished Lecturer in Literature at Brooklyn College.

October 24th, 2019

  • Rosalie Moffett 6:00pm: A Poetry Reading by Rosalie Moffett
    Rosalie Moffett is the author of Nervous System, (Ecco/Harper Collins) winner of the National Poetry Series. She is also the author of June in Eden (Ohio State University Press).  She has been awarded the “Discovery”/Boston Review prize, a Wallace Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University, and scholarships from the Tin House and Bread Loaf writing workshops.  Her poems and essays have appeared in Tin House, The Believer, FIELD, Narrative, Kenyon Review, Agni, Ploughshares, and other magazines, as well as in the anthology “Gathered: Contemporary Quaker Poets.” She is a professor at the University of Southern Indiana.

October 30th, 2019

  • Mohamed Asem for Perfect Day Publishing, June 2018. Photo by Jason Quigley. 6:00pm: A Nonfiction Reading by Mohamed Asem
    Mohamed Asem - July, 2016: Three days after the terror attack on Bastille Day, Mohamed Asem is detained overnight by British immigration officials without cause. In an elegantly digressive, self-interrogative style, Asem describes the boredom and uncertainty of confinement, and how this specific kind of helplessness leads, inevitably, to a self-reckoning. What series of events has led to this moment? Stranger in the Pen examines the burden of being disconnected from one’s homeland, unpacks the emotional toll of racial profiling, and illuminates the quietly surprising ways in which grief can change one’s life.
     
    Asem will appear in conversation with his publisher, Michael Heald, of Perfect Day Publishing.

November 15th, 2019

  • David Kroman '11 5:00pm: English Alumni Reading: Fiction and Nonfiction
    William Aime (’15) and David Kroman (’11) return to campus reading from the work they’ve done since graduation. Both Aime and Kroman have had some success – in different ways – in the writing world. They will talk about paying the bills, being newly graduated, and keeping the writing flame going, long after the spark of undergraduate classes has dimmed away.

March 17th, 2020

  • Nikky Finney 6:00pm: A Poetry Reading by Nikky Finney

    Nikky Finney was born in South Carolina, within listening distance of the sea.  A child of activists, she came of age during the civil rights and Black Arts Movements. At Talladega College, nurtured by Hale Woodruff’s Amista murals, Finney began to understand the powerful synergy between art and history. Finney has authored four books of poetry: Head Off & Split (2011); The World Is Round (2003); Rice (1995); and On Wings Made of Gauze (1985). The John H. Bennett, Jr. Chair in Southern Letters and Literature at the University of South Carolina, Finney also authored Heartwood (1997), edited The Ringing Ear: Black Poets Lean South (2007), and co-founded the Affrilachian Poets. Finney’s fourth book of poetry, Head Off & Split was awarded the 2011 National Book Award for poetry.

April 1st, 2020

  • Rachel Zucker 6:00pm: A Poetry Reading by Rachel Zucker
    Rachel Zucker is the author of ten books, including, most recently, SoundMachine (Wave Books, 2019). A recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, MacDowell Colony and the Sustainable Arts Foundation, Zucker is an adjunct professor at New York University and the founder and host of the podcast Commonplace: Conversations with Poets (and Other People). Zucker is currently working on an immersive audio project (also called SoundMachine) and a book of lectures called The Poetics of Wrongness.

News

  • Karla and Sahana at Meetup Night.
    July 23
    Our Community Friends Program matches international students with local resident volunteers to help them feel welcome and at home during their time at Lewis & Clark College.
  • April 29
    Tuse Mahenya BA ’21, an English major and political economy minor from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, is organizing Lewis & Clark’s first TEDx event, “The Deconstruction of Everything We Know.” Scheduled for October 9, the event will give students a platform to share their ideas and hear from others about times their preconceived notions were challenged.
  • March 20
    The Academy of American Poets Prize is a national poetry award for college students.  This contest is open to all students with senior standing and currently enrolled full-time at Lewis & Clark College.  This includes non-English majors. 
  • December 3
    At first glance, chemistry and English have little in common. Yet two courses from these disciplines are now intertwined, thanks to a rare tome acquired in 2014 by Watzek Library’s Special Collections: an illuminated 15th-century book of hours.
  • Mae Johnson BA '19 and Sydney Owada BA '19 at the opening reception for their new exhibit.
    September 24
    Two Lewis & Clark seniors have crafted a new Special Collections exhibit to present religious texts spanning 500 years. The students used an interdisciplinary approach to understand the impact that annotation and translation have had on how societies view and engage with Christianity. The final exhibit showcases their efforts in a detailed and nuanced analysis of how religious materials have influenced broader participation.
  • September 11
    Warren Kluber BA ’12 arrived at Lewis & Clark unsure of what he wanted to study. An English degree, a passion for the power of theatre, and a summer research project studying oral traditions in West Africa clarified his path. Now a PhD candidate at Columbia University, he has published his scholarly insights in three leading academic journals. We caught up with Kluber to learn more.
  • August 16
    Manufactured distrust. Underrepresented voices. Seemingly intractable problems. Industry-wide disruption. Being a good journalist requires clear writing, sharp thinking, and relentless task-juggling, all skills honed in the liberal arts. Whether covering breaking news in Portland, or chronicling trade missions to Thailand, young alumni are applying their Lewis & Clark skills locally and globally.
  • May 30
    Bradley Davis BA ’18, Caia Jaisle BA ’18, and Kelley Koeppen BA ’18 have been chosen to participate in the Fulbright program, a highly competitive award which fosters international scholarship and understanding through travel and research.
  • May 15
    Kim Stafford, associate professor and founding director of the Northwest Writing Institute, has been chosen to serve as Oregon’s ninth poet laureate, Governor Kate Brown JD ’85 announced this morning. Stafford will serve a two-year term as “an ambassador of poetry across the state.”
  • September 8
    Funds two years of study at University of Cambridge for first-generation college student.
  • September 8

    “Through its Fellowship Programs, the Ford Foundation seeks to increase the diversity of the nation’s college and university faculties by increasing their ethnic and racial diversity, to maximize the educational benefits of diversity, and to increase the number of professors who can and will use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students.”

    Each year, the Ford Foundation offers approximately 65 predoctoral fellowships ($24,000 per year for up to three years), as well as dissertation and postdoctoral fellowships.

  • September 8
    The Luce Scholars Program is a nationally competitive fellowship program. It was launched by the Henry Luce Foundation in 1974 to enhance the understanding of Asia among potential leaders in American society.
  • January 25
    Robert Hass, the former United States Poet Laureate, winner of the National Book Award, and recipient of both the MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship and the Pulitzer Prize, will read his poetry at Lewis & Clark at 6 p.m. on February 6.
  • April 11

    Learn about the work being done—and recognition being received—by our outstanding faculty.

  • March 27
    The Horror of Normalcy: Katherine Dunn, Geek Love, and Cult Literature opens to the public April 4. This exhibition provides a first look at the literary archive of the cult Portland author, who arranged to bequeath her collection to Lewis & Clark before her death in 2016.
  • February 16
    Two of just 37 poets selected from among 1,800 applicants, poets Corey Van Landingham BA ’08 and Nick Lantz BA ’03 are recipients of 2017 National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships. One of Van Landingham’s poems was printed in the Jan. 16 issue of The New Yorker.
  • December 9
    Noah Foster-Koth BA ’19 heard his screenplay Red Ivory come to life during a table reading at the Seattle International Film Festival’s Catalyst Screenplay Competition. Inspired by a 2013 trip Foster-Koth made to Tanzania, his work explores that country’s blood ivory trade and the individuals who have dedicated themselves to its obstruction.
  • September 29
    For Associate Professor of English Pauls Toutonghi, summer break meant a three-month national tour for his new book, Dog Gone. Now he’s back in the classroom, teaching fiction writing and encouraging his students to mine their own lives for stories.
  • September 22
    PiLA fellows spend a year of full-time service with nonprofits and NGOS in Latin America and the Caribbean.
  • September 18
    The Elie Wiesel Prize in Ethics Essay Contest challenges college students to analyze current ethical issues in today’s world.
  • March 28

    The most recent issue of The New Yorkerfeatures an essay by Associate Professor of English Pauls Toutonghi. The piece tells the story of a Moroccan organization’s promising new technology: CloudFisher, a system that harvests water from fog.

  • October 30
    Lewis & Clark professors are renowned researchers and scholars.
  • Shiela Gallagher '85
    April 27
    The uncommon is Sheila Gallagher’s norm.
  • November 14
    David Oehler is the new office administrator for Public Affairs and Communications. What does this mean for you?
  • July 14
    Through poetry and prose, new generations discover the power of creative writing at Lewis & Clark.
  • April 28
    Sidebar: Talking Recklessly
  • April 28
    William Stafford was a significant national figure in three overlapping fields. As a poet, he was and is revered by readers around the world; while he was alive he won many honors, including the National Book Award for Traveling through the Dark, and terms as poet laureate of Oregon and of the United States.
  • August 6
    Ask Pulitzer Prize–winner Alice Walker why she recently awarded her papers to Emory University, and she will tell you: “Having visited several libraries at different universities, I realized the importance to me of a lively, diverse, committed-to-human-growth atmosphere.”
  • August 6
    Karen Gross, assistant professor of English, won a 2008 Graves Award in recognition of her teaching accomplishments.
  • August 6
    In February, the Department of English hosted a well-attended poetry symposium, cosponsored by the Kinsman Foundation, to explore the relevancy of poetry in today’s world.

Blurbs

  • Lyell Asher, associate professor of English, is cited in a May 7, 2019 article by The College Fix, which also mentions Asher’s earlier Chronicle of Higher Education essay on the diversity debate in higher education.

  • Kim Stafford, associate professor, director of the Northwest Writing Institute and Poet Laureate of the State of Oregon, was featured in a Madras Pioneer article about Stafford’s participation in an honored poets’ reading event held in that community. 

  • Don’t give yourself boatloads of free time immediately after graduation. Keep working hard, and don’t stop meeting new people.

    However, don’t put pressure on yourself to follow the path defined by your major. Allow your plans to change, and stay open to opportunities and surprises.

  • It’s said that when a student is ready, a teacher will appear. Be ready. Show up; step up, and stay up. Keep an open heart and an open mind. Learn at your own pace. Be good to yourself and enjoy the moment!

  • It feels like the decisions you make right now will dictate what you will be doing for the rest of your life and that is not so. A liberal arts education teaches you how to learn so you can continue to learn and grow for the rest of your life. There are seasons to life and you can redirect yourself to follow your passion at any time. I have been a non-profit fund raiser, a mom, a sign language interpreter and event planner. To every thing there is a season.

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