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April 17th, 2017

  • Image preview 3:30pm: “What’s A Definition in Biology?” Richard Boyd, Cornell University
    According to the ‘homeostatic property cluster’ conception many categories in biology and other sciences are defined by naturally occurring property clusters and their underlying clustering mechanisms.  The HPC conception has been challenged on the grounds that it doesn’t accord with actual definitional practices in biology and that it fails to account for the role of phylogeny in defining biological taxa.  A response is developed that focuses on (1) the role of published ‘definitions’ in the sciences and (2) the relationship between philosophy of science and the (other) sciences.

April 19th, 2017

  • 4:30pm: English Honors Presentations
    Please join us for honors presentations by senior English majors Cole Hildebrand, Hannah Smay, and Sammie Weiss.  Abstracts of each thesis will be provided.  Each student will give a brief summary of their paper to be followed by a question and answer session.

April 21st, 2017

  • 3:30pm: “Berkeley on the Heterogeneity of the Senses”, Honors Thesis Presented by Bridger Ehli


    In his Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision, George Berkeley presents a revolutionary theory of visual perception. Central to this theory is what scholars have dubbed the “Heterogeneity Thesis,” which Berkeley calls the “main part and pillar” of his theory. This thesis is often interpreted as the claim that there are no common sensibles––that the sensible qualities we touch, for example, are not the sensible qualities we see. On the face of it, the thesis appears to be false, or at least to depart from common sense: we think we often see and touch the same quality or the same object. The aim of this paper is not to defend the Heterogeneity Thesis but to answer a series of questions: what is the Heterogeneity Thesis, what role does it play in Berkeley’s theory of perceptual experience, and why did he view it as the main part and pillar of his theory? I argue that Berkeley adopts several versions of the Heterogeneity Thesis, and that each version plays a crucial role in Berkeley’s story of how we navigate a spatial world, visually.


April 25th, 2017

  • Image preview 4:00pm - 5:30pm: History Senior Thesis Poster Session
    Please join the students in Professor Elliott Young’s history research seminar on Migration and Diaspora in the Americas as they present their theses at the end-of-semester poster session.  The research seminar is the capstone course of the history major.  Student theses involve in-depth primary source research, mastery of historical literature on a chosen subject, and intense editing, revision, and peer review.  The goal of the seminar is the completion of an original and rigorously researched thesis that advances historical scholarship.

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    Rebecca Duncan spider research
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    In an unprecedented achievement for Lewis & Clark students, six seniors earned prestigious honors from the Fulbright Program in the spring of 2008.
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    In March, senior Brendan Larsen, senior Alec Kerins, and Assistant Professor of Biology Greta Binford spent their spring break bringing lab research and global engagement together in Puerto Plata, a region in the Dominican Republic.
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