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  • A bauhaus-inspired chess set is one of the pieces on display at the new special collections retro...
    October 30
    The Staatliches Bauhaus, an art school founded in 1919 in Weimar, Germany, was a pioneer in arts education. On the 100th anniversary of its founding, two German studies majors collaborated with faculty and Watzek Library’s Special Collections to curate a collection featuring replicas of iconic Bauhaus furniture, art, and photographs.
  • October 23

    Biology major Brendan Creemer BA ’21 worked this summer as a research intern at Oregon Health & Science University. There, he helped research the problem of immune rejection caused by stem cell transplantation. The research could lead to a treatment for Usher Syndrome.  

  • March 29

    The oldest student-run symposium in the country, Lewis & Clark’s International Affairs Symposium runs April 8 to 10 this year. The event brings prominent scholars from around the globe to debate on the forces challenging the “status quo” worldwide.

  • December 3
    At first glance, chemistry and English have little in common. Yet two courses from these disciplines are now intertwined, thanks to a rare tome acquired in 2014 by Watzek Library’s Special Collections: an illuminated 15th-century book of hours.
  • July 9
    At Lewis & Clark, where students learn science by doing science, collaborative research with professors is an academic hallmark. The John S. Rogers Science Program supports several such projects each summer, and this year included multidisciplinary research with an especially timely goal: create a computer game that will teach users how to act in the aftermath of a natural disaster.
  • July 5
    Watzek Library’s Special Collections has been awarded a $30,100 competitive grant in support of a five-year project to interview members of Portland’s Vietnamese community, collecting oral histories that will document the region’s complex and changing urban landscape.
  • May 14
    Benno Kolland BA ’21, a rising sophomore from Santa Cruz, California, has built and launched a rocket to a height of two miles—higher than the altitude of Mount Hood. His next step? Bringing commercial space flight within reach.
  • April 26
    Megan Glavin BA ’19 and Sema Hasan BA ’18 were selected to present their original research at the 2018 Notre Dame Peace Conference, an event for students from around the world to share their work and discuss issues related to peace studies, social justice, and global activism.
  • Chemistry professor Anne Bentley helping students with their summer research.
    October 28
    Student-faculty research is central to a Lewis & Clark education.
  • March 29

    The oldest student-run symposium in the country, Lewis & Clark’s International Affairs Symposium runs April 8 to 10 this year. The event brings prominent scholars from around the globe to debate on the forces challenging the “status quo” worldwide.

  • 2019 Gender Studies Symposium cochair Zoe Maughan BA '19 tabling at New Student Orientation.
    March 7
    The 38th Gender Studies Symposium digs into essential questions regarding the practice of care, gender politics, and the effect the two have on each other by asking “Who Cares?” 
  • March 7
    The 38th Gender Studies Symposium digs into essential questions regarding the practice of care, gender politics, and the effect the two have on each other by asking “Who Cares?” The student-organized symposium will include three days of lectures, workshops, performances, and panel discussions.
  • Kundai Chirindo, associate professor of rhetoric and media studies, is serving as faculty directo...
    February 26

    From February 28 to March 2, Lewis & Clark will host the fourth annual Pacific Northwest Race, Rhetoric, and Media Symposium. Featuring guest keynotes and student research presentations, this year’s theme is politics in sports and popular culture. The event is a collaboration with the University of Puget Sound, Whitman College, and Willamette University.

  • February 15
    The fourth annual student-run symposium, History and Movement: Transition in the Middle East, explores the development of modern and historical discourse through the lens of transition. Students will discuss gender, religion, politics, and the implications of continuity and change in the region over time. The symposium kicks off on Monday, February 19.
  • December 12
    Assistant Professor of Biology Margaret Metz’s research explores how climate and latitude affect the coexistence of tree species in forests around the world. Her recent research on forest diversity in Ecuador is featured in the international science journal Nature.
  • October 16
    This year’s symposium, Environmental Engagement in Tough Times, will take on pressing environmental issues with an emphasis on their social dimensions, like sustainable housing and equitable city growth. The three-day event kicks off with a keynote panel in Portland’s Pearl District on October 24.
  • October 11
    Three sociology students have returned to Lewis & Clark from their research in Cambodia alongside Assistant Professor of Sociology Maryann Bylander. They presented to peers and faculty the conclusions from their fieldwork on the practical and ethical implications of microcredit in developing countries.
  • Physics professor Mohamed Anber and physics major Ben Kolligs '18 work through a theoretical phys...
    September 19
    This summer Lewis & Clark acquired a computational server that will improve the speed and ease of research calculations. Researchers studying computational physics, genetic sequencing, and climate modeling have already begun to imagine how this powerful hardware will enhance their research.
  • August 16
    Just a year after joining Lewis & Clark, Assistant Professor Mohamed Anber is the recipient of a National Science Foundation grant in support of his work in elementary particle physics. With colleagues and students from other departments, Anber is helping build new research capabilities for asking and answering very big questions.
  • A photo taken by Bylander of a vehicle packed with Cambodian migrant workers and their children a...
    July 7
    Assistant Professor of Sociology Maryann Bylander studies mobility and migration in the Global South. Currently in Cambodia leading a field research expedition with students, Bylander has just had a column published in the Phnom Penh Post. In it, she urges better treatment of migrant Cambodian workers in Thailand.
  • April 7
    Assistant Professor of Sociology Maryann Bylander will travel this summer to Cambodia with three Lewis & Clark students to investigate the use of microcredit—a finance model of providing small, affordable loans to new businesses in developing areas. The expedition is being funded by an ASIANetwork Freeman Student-Faculty Fellows grant.
  • March 27
    The Horror of Normalcy: Katherine Dunn, Geek Love, and Cult Literature opens to the public April 4. This exhibition provides a first look at the literary archive of the cult Portland author, who arranged to bequeath her collection to Lewis & Clark before her death in 2016.
  • November 11
    Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Jessica Kleiss and her students look to the clouds to improve climate change prediction.
  • November 11
    Kristina Dill BA ’16 is the latest Lewis & Clark graduate to earn a spot as a finalist for the internationally regarded Rhodes Scholarship. If she wins, she will be one of 32 students honored nationwide and Lewis & Clark’s third alumni to attain this prestigious award, which funds pursuit of a graduate degree at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.
  • Flickr image of Oregon Supreme Court courtesy of Bob Nikkel
    September 12
    Campaign finance reform is not a topic for the faint of heart. But recent graduates Maya Gold BA ’14 and Walker Davis BA ’15 are intrepid researchers, and the result of their labors is an academic paper, just published in Election Law Journal, that explores the often-convoluted world of Oregon’s campaign finance laws.
  • Professor of Biology Greg Hermann and Beverly Rabbitts '06 microinject a worm to alter its gene e...
    August 16

    Biology professor Greg Hermann has been awarded a nearly half-million dollar grant from the National Science Foundation, his third NSF grant since joining Lewis & Clark. His three-year project on the development of lysosome-related organelles in nematodes will engage between 25 and 55 undergraduates each year in mentored, investigative, and original research.

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