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Public Affairs and Communications (PubCom)

Typography and Fonts

Designing with fonts is deceptively difficult, so please get in touch if you have questions during your project. 

Contact Amy Drill if you have questions.

Guidelines for Lewis & Clark typography

Adobe’s Goudy Old Style Std is the primary font family for Lewis & Clark. We use the Regular font most frequently. Use the Italic and Bold fonts sparingly, and only to provide emphasis in body copy (sentences and paragraphs). Do not use the Bold font in headlines.

Adobe Goudy Old Style Std Regular
Adobe Goudy Old Style Std Regular
Adobe Goudy Old Style Std Italic
Adobe Goudy Old Style Std Italic
Adobe Goudy Old Style Std Bold
Adobe Goudy Old Style Std Bold

The secondary font family for Lewis & Clark communications is Adobe’s Helvetica Neue LT. From this family, we use the Roman and Bold fonts most often. Use Adobe Helvetica Neue LT primarily for headings and subheadings. Occasionally, it may be appropriate for body copy.

Adobe Helvetica Neue LT 45 Light
Adobe Helvetica Neue LT 45 Light
Adobe Helvetica Neue LT 55 Roman
Adobe Helvetica Neue LT 55 Roman
Adobe Helvetica Neue LT 56 Italic
Adobe Helvetica Neue LT 56 Italic
Adobe Helvetica Neue LT 75 Bold
Adobe Helvetica Neue LT 75 Bold

Legal Notice

Lewis & Clark does not maintain institutional site licenses for these font families. Before you use any of these fonts, you need to verify that a legal copy has been purchased for the computer on which you are producing your project. You can buy individual fonts, or you can purchase complete families.

To learn more about the legal issues involved, follow these links: 

Designing on a Mac or in Windows?

A note about designing on a Mac: To create a professional-quality print piece you should avoid applying the bold and italic styles to your font. Applying these styles distorts the font and can cause headaches at the printer’s. To achieve the best results, choose the bold or italic font from the family within which you are working. These “drawn” fonts are carefully designed for use in pieces of fine quality.

Got a Mac? Why you should choose a bold (italic) font rather than apply the bold (italic) style

Working in Windows? Why you need to apply styles