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Blockquotes and Pullquotes

A pullquote is the web equivalent of a print element called a call-out or quote, often seen in print, where a text element is highlighted in a larger type-size and set adjacent to the main stream of content.

Guidelines

Below are the available styles for pullquotes on the Lewis & Clark website. Please respect the following:

Do

  1. Use pullquotes to pull out a short standalone paragraph’s worth of content and highlight it.
  2. When you do use pullquotes, consider alternating them left and right to break up the content.
  3. Try to use pullquotes for actual quotes.

Don’t

  1. Do not overuse pullquotes; one per screenful is plenty.
  2. Do not use a pullquote to simply indent some text, use the indent buttons instead.
  3. Do not include leading quotes for the quote or leading em dashes for speakers as those will be added automatically when you specify the pullquote as a quote.
  4. Do not surround the pullquote tags with paragraph tags or vice-versa.
  5. Do not use the school-specific colors outside of it’s respective site.

We reserve the right to restrict/remove editing rights from site editors who ignore the above guidelines; if you have question or need guidance, just ask. We are more than happy to help you work through any issue.

Examples

You can apply these styles by simply adding specific class attributes to any <div> tag in HTML. You can now use the class in certain widgets.

Set Right, Quoted, Thin

Deborah Heath, associate professor of anthropology, has spent nearly twenty years examining the intersections between nature and culture and between culture and science. As an anthropologist, Heath is keenly interested in how diverse cultural environments shape the ways we know the world.

My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.Deborah HeathAssociate Professor of Anthropology

“Anthropology is uniquely positioned to bridge the gap between what C.P. Snow called the ‘two cultures’ of science and the humanities,” Heath said. “My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.”

Heath, co-editor of the book Genetic Nature/Culture: Anthropology and Science Beyond the Two-Culture Divide, has previously explored these relations between science and culture in studies of genetics and examples of food production. At the height of the Human Genome Project, Heath received NIH funding to launch a multi-sited project called “Mapping Genetic Knowledge: An Anthropological Approach.”

“The project traced how genetic knowledges emerged from the interactions among scientists, clinicians, and health advocates, all stakeholders in the aim to better understand heritable diseases,” Heath said.

Here is the HTML code for the above example:

<p>

Deborah Heath, associate professor of anthropology, has spent nearly twenty years examining the intersections between nature and culture and between culture and science. As an anthropologist, Heath is keenly interested in how diverse cultural environments shape the ways we know the world.

</p>

<blockquote class="pulled thin right quote">

<p>My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders. <span class="speaker">Deborah Heath<span class="title">Associate Professor of Anthropology</span></span></p>

</div>

<p>

"Anthropology is uniquely positioned to bridge the gap between what C.P. Snow called the 'two cultures' of science and the humanities," Heath said. "My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders."

</p>

<p>

Heath, co-editor of the book Genetic Nature/Culture: Anthropology and Science Beyond the Two-Culture Divide, has previously explored these relations between science and culture in studies of genetics and examples of food production. At the height of the Human Genome Project, Heath received NIH funding to launch a multi-sited project called “Mapping Genetic Knowledge: An Anthropological Approach.”

</p>

<p>

“The project traced how genetic knowledges emerged from the interactions among scientists, clinicians, and health advocates, all stakeholders in the aim to better understand heritable diseases,” Heath said.

</p>

Set Left, College Color

“Anthropology is uniquely positioned to bridge the gap between what C.P. Snow called the ‘two cultures’ of science and the humanities,” Heath said. “My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.”

My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.

Heath, co-editor of the book Genetic Nature/Culture: Anthropology and Science Beyond the Two-Culture Divide, has previously explored these relations between science and culture in studies of genetics and examples of food production. At the height of the Human Genome Project, Heath received NIH funding to launch a multi-sited project called “Mapping Genetic Knowledge: An Anthropological Approach.”

<p>

"Anthropology is uniquely positioned to bridge the gap between what C.P. Snow called the 'two cultures' of science and the humanities," Heath said. "My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders."

</p>

<blockquote class="pulled left college">

<p>My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.</p>

</div>

<p>

Heath, co-editor of the book <em>Genetic Nature/Culture: Anthropology and Science Beyond the Two-Culture Divide</em>, has previously explored these relations between science and culture in studies of genetics and examples of food production. At the height of the Human Genome Project, Heath received NIH funding to launch a multi-sited project called "Mapping Genetic Knowledge: An Anthropological Approach."

</p>

Styles Available

Combine the styles below to produce the effect needed — only the class attribute is required.

Use “pullquote” inside the class attribute to trigger all these styles. It is required on the pullquote tag to produce all subsequent styling.

<blockquote class="pulled ">

text

</blockquote>

left, right

Without an alignment of left or right, the surrounding text will not flow around the pullquote. Use left or right to direct the quote to the chosen side.

<blockquote class="pulled left">

text

</blockquote>

 

<blockquote class="pulled right">

text

</blockquote>

stacked

When combined with a left or right alignment, adjacent pullquotes will flow across the available width rather than immediately be forced below the previous one.

<blockquote class="pulled left stacked">

text

</blockquote>

 

<blockquote class="pulled left stacked">

text

</blockquote>

thin, normal, thick, thicker, thirds

Three widths are available for pullquotes: thin, normal and thick. Thin is one-third the available text-width, normal (no specification) is half the available width, and thick is two-thirds of the available text-width. Due to the vagaries of browser rendering, normal will not be exactly half, but half plus a little. This is equally true for thin and thick. Thirds is specifically for use with stacked pullquotes, in that in a wide layout you would be able to see three pullquotes across the page before wrapping.

<blockquote class="pulled thin">

text

</blockquote>

<blockquote class="pulled ">

text

</blockquote>

<blockquote class="pulled thick">

text

</blockquote> <blockquote class="pulled left stacked thirds">

text

</blockquote>

quote

Quote adds a leading left curly quote, italicizes the main text and then allows you to add/use a span tag with the speaker’s name, automatically offset with a leading em dash.

<blockquote class="pulled quote">

text

<span class="speaker">Speaker Name</span>
</div>

college, graduate, law, dark_grey

Four additional colors are available: one for each school and a generic darker style of the base style. As stated above, do not use school colored style outside of the school in question.

Default

<blockquote class="pulled thin right quote">

My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.<span class="speaker">Deborah Heath<span class="title">Associate Professor of Anthropology</span></span>

</blockquote>

My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.Deborah HeathAssociate Professor of Anthropology

 

<div class="pulled thin right quote college">

My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.<span class="speaker">Deborah Heath<span class="title">Associate Professor of Anthropology</span></span>

</blockquote>

My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.Deborah HeathAssociate Professor of Anthropology

 

<blockquote class="pulled thin right quote graduate">

My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.<span class="speaker">Deborah Heath<span class="title">Associate Professor of Anthropology</span></span>

</blockquote>

My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.Deborah HeathAssociate Professor of Anthropology

 

<blockquote class="pulled thin right quote law">

My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.<span class="speaker">Deborah Heath<span class="title">Associate Professor of Anthropology</span></span>

</blockquote>

My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.Deborah HeathAssociate Professor of Anthropology

 

<blockquote class="pulled thin right quote dark_grey">

My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.<span class="speaker">Deborah Heath<span class="title">Associate Professor of Anthropology</span></span>

</blockquote>

My job is to understand how meaning is made and translated, to trace how knowledge that is both cultural and material circulates among scientists and other stakeholders.Deborah HeathAssociate Professor of Anthropology

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