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    September 9
    KLC’s music publication is off its hiatus and back in action!
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    September 30
    The fourth part in a series on community solar, this post investigates the evolving state trend of engaging utilities in planning community solar projects.
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    September 24
    Hawaii’s Public Utility Commission issued a guidance document recommending rate reforms to better account for distributed generation customers’ use of the electricity system. The HECO Companies, in turn, filed a plan that proposed significant charges and modifications to distributed generation customers’ compensation structure. Though the PUC will not likely approve the plan as written, its ultimate decision could influence energy policy on the mainland.
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    September 23
    Renewable energy is increasingly cost-competitive with fossil fuels, inviting investment based purely on its economic, rather than environmental, virtues.
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    September 23
    GEI Staff Attorney Amelia Schlusser discusses the Fifth Circuit’s flawed legal reasoning in Exelon Wind v. Nelson.
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    September 23
    The Green Energy Institute’s Director responds to the recent decision Exelon Wind v. Nelson, in which the Fifth Circuit held that only qualifying facilities generating “firm” renewable power are entitled to enter into long-term contracts under PURPA.
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    September 22
    The third in a series on community solar, this post describes how virtual net metering is a key policy for encouraging community-scale renewable energy.
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    September 15

    Three U.S. cities—Burlington, VT, Greensburg, KS, and Beaverton, OR— are proving that the transition to a 100% renewable power grid is achievable in the near term. 

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    September 15
    The second in a four-part series on community solar power, this post describes four distinct models for community-scale solar development.
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    September 13
    The U.S. House of Representatives is considering three bills to promote renewable energy on federal lands. Two of the bills are good renewable energy policy, while the third needlessly sacrifices important principles of environmental review.
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    September 12
    Hawaii’s Public Utility Commission envisions a substantially reduced role for electric utilities as owners and operators of generation facilities. The state’s investor-owned utilities, the HECO Companies, did not directly address the PUC’s proposal in their recent Power Supply Improvement Plan filings. The decisions that Hawaii’s PUC makes on the issue might have broad implications for the shape of the electricity industry in the United States in the future.
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    September 6
    The International Energy Agency projects that an unstable policy framework in developed countries such as the United States may slow the growth of renewable energy. The United States should adopt more stable policies to ensure the growth of renewable energy.
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    September 5

    The first in a four-part series on community solar, this post describes the basic elements of community solar. Later posts will describe existing community solar models, describe projects and obstacles in Oregon, and propose how Oregon can further incentivize community solar.

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    September 3

    Professor Powers has received a Fulbright Scholarship to study renewable energy policy in Denmark and Spain. This opening blog post discusses the scholarship and her areas of study. 

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    June 26
    While pundits and politicians rail against the so-called “war on coal,” the fossil fuel industry and the elected officials they support are quietly launching a war against renewable energy.
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    April 15
    On November 1, 2013, Samuel Tidwell B.A. ’13 left his home in Greenfield, California with nothing but essential belongings that could be carried in a backpack and a homemade hand cart. Only three weeks earlier, Tidwell had committed himself to walking across the United States.
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    February 13
    California is backing away from a bill that would have strengthened its renewable portfolio standard. This move threatens the state’s leadership on renewable energy policy.
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    April 30
    A Fulbright-winning professor explores nonfiction in Mexico
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    January 2
    Pamela Frasch’s path to animal law was a circuitous one, since she started her career as a professional musical theatre performer. Nowadays, Pam is the Assistant Dean of the Animal Law Program and Executive Director of the Center for Animal Law Studies, making her one of the world’s leading experts in this growing field.
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    December 17
    Student bloggers share what life is like at Lewis & Clark.
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    April 5
    Just before the Trayvon Martin shooting, Professor Dyan Watson wrote eloquently about the fears and hopes she has for her young black son, Caleb, many of which mirror the issues that have been raised in the national conversation about Martin’s death. Watson’s article, published in March in Rethinking Schools magazine, has generated buzz online, being featured on the Washington Post’s education blog, Answer Sheet, and on CommonDreams.org and Alternet.
  • January 26
    Indian Law professor and blog author of Native America, Discovered and Conquered Robert Miller was noted by The Wall Street Journal’s Blog Watch in the category of Native Americans.
  • January 25
    Alaskan and Yupik Eskimo Callan Chythlook-Sifsof was named to the U.S. Olympic team. In 2006, Chythlook-Sifsof earned a berth on the U.S. Snowboard Team and took third place in her first World Cup snowboardcross competition in Japan. She won the U.S. National Championship title that same year and took a fourth-place in World Cup Finals in Quebec. Read the full story.
  • January 25
    In September 2009, Wesley Hodges and James Roberts were discovered illegally digging on private property in Burke County, Georgia. When state Department of Natural Resources Ranger Jeff Billips found the pair, they had already dug up piles of artifacts and human bone fragments. Hodges and Roberts appeared before State Court Judge Jerry M. Daniel last Wednesday where they entered guilty pleas for excavating without written permission, criminal trespass, and littering...
  • January 23
    The Mashantucket Pequot Tribe in Connecticut operates the Foxwoods Casino and Resort. It has been attempting to restructure more than $2 billion worth of debt since last summer. It is reported that it has reached an agreement to continue these negotiations with its senior lenders. According to a New York public relations firm, the Tribe and “a majority of its senior lenders” have reached “an agreement in principle” to extend a forbearance agreement through A...
  • January 23
    The news reports that the Klamath Tribes in Oregon are the first to approve a $1 billion agreement for restoring Klamath River salmon and bringing peace to the long-standing water battles in the basin. The Tribes announced that their citizens voted to approve the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement, which is part of a broader settlement designed to remove aging hydroelectric dams that block salmon. The overall settlement is expected to be signed by the dozens of...
  • January 23
    Indian Country Today reports that the 3,000 citizens of the Jemez Pueblo in New Mexico are on the verge of building the nation’s first utility-scale solar plant on tribal land. “We don’t have any revenue coming in except for a little convenience store,” said James Roger Madalena, a former tribal governor who now represents the pueblo in the state Legislature. “It’s very critical that we become innovative, creative, that we come up with something that wil...
  • January 23
    The news reports that a rare 400-year-old slate tablet was discovered this past summer at Jamestown, Virginia, the first permanent English settlement in America. With the help of enhanced imagery and an expert in Elizabethan script, archaeologists are beginning to unravel the meaning of the mysterious text and images etched into this tablet. Various enhancements of the images and writing have helped researchers identify a 16th-century writing style and to discern ne...
  • January 23
    As a young archaeologist, Jeff Blick helped make an astounding discovery in Virginia – the skeletons of 112 dogs buried by American Indians nearly 1,000 years ago. He is still studying the bones, and he hopes the latest tests will guide scientists to study the ancient transformation of wolf to dog. After 13 or so years of spent digging ended in the ’80s, Blick’s work continues in his archaeology lab at Georgia College and State University. Blick and his st...
  • January 23
    The Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation in Connecticut could become a “green” island unto itself in a few years. That is the ultimate goal of a cogeneration approach the Tribe will embrace with a $34 million project it expects to start testing this spring. Initially, it is expected to provide nearly 60% of the tribe’s electricity needs and at the same time heat and cool Foxwoods Resort Casino. Two 10,300-horsepower jet engines will propel the system, which w...

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