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  • Biennial 2019
    August 22
    LC faculty participate in Disjecta’s 2019 Biennial
  • Karla and Sahana at Meetup Night.
    July 23
    Our Community Friends Program matches international students with local resident volunteers to help them feel welcome and at home during their time at Lewis & Clark College.
  • Rose VL Deli owner William Vuong.
    November 28
    Azen Jaffe ’19 on “Vietnamese Portland: Memory, History, Community”
  • September 14
    Learn-Discuss-Act
  • September 14
    The course is organized around a variety of themes that will explore the philosophy of civil disobedience as well as examining historical examples from the US and around the world of liberation and civil rights movements.
  • January 28
    Here is a quick summary of some of the things we’ve achieved over the past five years, by the numbers.
  • Dallaire Scholar Fabrice Sibomana was among the commemoration's speakers at Kwibuka 25.
    April 15
    Twenty-five years after the 1994 Tutsi genocide in Rwanda, Lewis & Clark joined communities around the world in commemorating the tragedy, with Kwibuka 25. Fabrice Sibomana, the current L&C Roméo Dallaire Scholar and a survivor of the genocide, spoke at the event alongside fellow students and dignitaries.
  • Wim Wiewel leads a community bike ride on his first day as president.
    February 26
    President Wim Wiewel attended the 2019 Higher Education Climate Leadership Summit, where he and fellow college and university leaders made a public pledge to work harder, faster, and smarter to drive climate action forward. In an op-ed in the Portland Business Journal, President Wim Wiewel discusses the work we’ve done and the work ahead.
  • October 26
    Health is an issue that impacts us all, yet many struggle to receive adequate health care. In hopes of better understanding these inequities, the 15th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies—titled Bitter Pills: Race, Health, and Medicine—focuses on the racialized dimensions of health, highlighting the voices of communities of color. Running November 7 through November 9, the symposium is free and open to the public.
  • July 5
    Watzek Library’s Special Collections has been awarded a $30,100 competitive grant in support of a five-year project to interview members of Portland’s Vietnamese community, collecting oral histories that will document the region’s complex and changing urban landscape.
  • May 15
    Kim Stafford, associate professor and founding director of the Northwest Writing Institute, has been chosen to serve as Oregon’s ninth poet laureate, Governor Kate Brown JD ’85 announced this morning. Stafford will serve a two-year term as “an ambassador of poetry across the state.”
  • March 8
    PEAC attorney Tom Buchele is quoted in this article on the Columbia River Crossing from ClimateWire: “How a bridge divides the environmentally conscious in Portland, Ore.”
  • November 29
    After years of negotiation, PEAC has helped community activists in Northwest Portland to win a Good Neighbor Agreement with steel foundry company ESCO to reduce pollution by an estimated 20%.
  • August 10
    PEAC attorney Tom Buchele writes on the problems with the Columbia River Crossing’s Draft Environmental Impact Statement.
  • September 6
    For those who want to make a difference through a career related to public service.
  • Pride 2019
    June 4

    Join us! Lewis & Clark staff, students, faculty, and friends are invited to march with TransActive in the parade on June 16.

  • April 24
    There are many ways to stay up-to-date on victims’ rights. 
    1)  Sign up for NCVLI’s listserv to receive updates on our programs and developments in victims’ rights, training announcements and other information about supporting crime victims.
    2)  Follow NCVLI on social media.  You can find us on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.
    3)  Join NCVLI’s membership alliance, the National Alliance of Victims’ Rights Attorneys and Advocates.
  • Editions of Street Roots available on campus
    April 17
    Environmental Studies student Shoshana Rybeck ’20, works to make copies of Street Roots newspaper available on campus.
  • Dallaire Scholar Fabrice Sibomana will be among the commemoration's speakers at Kwibuka 25.
    April 11
    Twenty-five years after the 1994 Tutsi genocide in Rwanda, Lewis & Clark will “remember, unite, and renew” with Kwibuka 25. 
  • April 5
    Help your community by filling out Lewis & Clark’s Campus Climate Survey!
  • Kundai Chirindo, associate professor of rhetoric and media studies, is serving as faculty directo...
    February 26

    From February 28 to March 2, Lewis & Clark will host the fourth annual Pacific Northwest Race, Rhetoric, and Media Symposium. Featuring guest keynotes and student research presentations, this year’s theme is politics in sports and popular culture. The event is a collaboration with the University of Puget Sound, Whitman College, and Willamette University.

  • February 26
  • October 26
    The 15th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies—titled Bitter Pills: Race, Health, and Medicine—focuses on the racialized dimensions of health, highlighting the voices of communities of color. 
  • February 28

    The 37th annual Gender Studies Symposium will explore what security looks like in the face of modern dangers. Students, faculty, and guests from Portland and beyond will examine issues through the lenses of community engagement, gender politics, and misconceptions surrounding sexuality. The student-run symposium runs from Wednesday, March 7 to Friday, March 9.

  • Katherine FitzGibbon
    February 23
    Recently, The Oregonian spotlighted Lewis & Clark Associate Professor of Music and Director of Choral Activities, Katherine FitzGibbon and her work on social justice through choral music.
  • February 15
    The fourth annual student-run symposium, History and Movement: Transition in the Middle East, explores the development of modern and historical discourse through the lens of transition. Students will discuss gender, religion, politics, and the implications of continuity and change in the region over time. The symposium kicks off on Monday, February 19.
  • January 29
    Lewis & Clark honored Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights leaders through its annual week of service featuring a series of speakers and events. The first collaborative event kicked off January 20 with 130 students participating in volunteer service around the Portland community.
  • December 12
    The Bill Emerson National Hunger Fellowship, a project of the Congressional Hunger Center, is a unique leadership development opportunity for motivated individuals seeking to make a difference in the struggle to eliminate hunger and poverty.
  • December 11
    The Coro Fellows Program in Public Affairs is a full-time, nine month, graduate-level experiential leadership training program that prepares diverse, talented and committed individuals for effective and ethical leadership in all aspects of the public affairs arena.
  • November 13
    The 14th annual Ray Warren Symposium, Legacy: Race and Remembrance, which ran from November 8 to 10, examined the way we view the past, reflect on the stories we tell, and delve into how storytelling can help us imagine a more equitable future.

Galleries

Blurbs

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art Michael Namkung is mentioned in the Hood River News June 5, 2019 edition. The article explores Namkung’s involvement with the Maryhill Museum of Art’s collaborative “Exquisite Gorge” art project.

  • The National Black Law Students Association (NBLSA) and Lewis & Clark Law School, in association with discoverlaw.org, hosted 80 middle school students from St. Andrew Nativity School for a day of action.

    The Lewis & Clark Law Black Law Students Association (BLSA) board members Brandon Kline, Anthony Blake, Josh Volvovic, Michelle Stowers, and Andrea Thompson and Lewis & Clark Law NBLSA board member Royce Williams organized the days events.

    During the first activity, the middle school students learned about the importance of writing personal statements for college admission. NBLSA volunteers guided students through a typical personal statement and gave suggestions about what each student could write for their own personal statement. Then, the students wrote their own personal statements and got immediate feedback from the NBLSA volunteers.

    Lunch was a big hit with the students. They got to experience a college buffet and chat with the NBLSA volunteers about life as law students.

    For the second activity, J.B. Kim, Lewis & Clark Law School’s Assistant Dean of Diversity & Academic Resources, led the students through a legal writing exercise. Students were given a fact pattern about a custody dispute and asked to write a letter to their client advising him on his chances of gaining custody. NBLSA volunteers worked closely with the students explaining the legal matters and statutes surrounding custody. The students were animated and engaged with the NBLSA volunteers.

    Everyone was sad to see the day come to an end. For more, see The Oregonian article!

     

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