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  • Mathematics and Chemistry Double Major Named Rhodes Finalist

    Jordan Gonzalez BA ’21 advanced to the final round of interviews for the Rhodes Scholarship, widely regarded as the most prestigious international scholarship program in the world. The scholarship allows exceptional, leadership-driven students from around the world to pursue higher degrees at the University of Oxford. Gonzalez is the fourth Lewis & Clark student to be named a Rhodes finalist in the last five years.
  • Cabaret in the Time of Coronavirus

    From November 4–7, the Lewis & Clark Theatre Department, along with the Music Department presented the musical Cabaret. Taking place in socially lively 1930s Berlin, this musical is a sharp political commentary told through provocative characters and musical numbers. Battling circumstance and technology, the performance could be seen both in-person and virtually while following health and safety guidelines.

  • Students Win Big at the Invent Oregon Collegiate Competition

    Ramez Attia BA ’21 and Matthew Brown BA ’21 were named the winning team at the annual Invent Oregon Collegiate State Finals, earning $10,000, plus an additional $2,000 as People’s Choice winners. Their invention is a cost-effective and tech-savvy device programmed to stop drunk driving before it happens.
  • Annual Ray Warren Symposium Addresses Race and Movement

    This year’s Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies, which will run from November 11 to 13, focuses on the concept of movement and the systems of power that determine our mobility. For the first time, the symposium will be held entirely online, free and open to all, including those living outside of Portland.
  • “Spiderwoman” Sits Down with Big Biology Podcast

    Biology professor and spider expert Greta Binford is the featured guest on the latest Big Biology podcast! Listen to the episode to hear Greta answer the question of whether venom use is based on body size, and how venom from Spiderman applies to this question.
  • Students Present Original Research Alongside Faculty at Annual Rogers Presentations

    Each year, undergraduate students across departments have the opportunity to participate in the John S. Rogers Science Research Program, which supports collaborative scientific research with Lewis & Clark faculty. At this year’s virtual presentations, projects ranged from an interactive game on earthquake preparedness to analysis on ideologies surrounding color blindness and racial passing.

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