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  • History Professor Secures Grant to Expand “Inside-Out” Course

    December 13: Assistant Professor of History Reiko Hillyer has been awarded a $5,000 planning grant from the Whiting Foundation to support the expansion of her interdisciplinary project, “Theatre From the Inside-Out: Illuminating Mass Incarceration.” Specifically, the grant will enrich Hillyer’s course Crime and Punishment in U.S. History, which she teaches at the Columbia River Correctional Institution (CRCI) in Portland.
  • Analyzing Public Diplomacy Through Portland’s Sister Cities

    November 26: Following a worldwide competition, the University of Southern California Center on Public Diplomacy has awarded Associate Professor Jennifer Hubbert one of three research fellowships. Her research will analyze the Sister Cities International program, including Portland’s vibrant sister city program.
  • Students Return from Collaborative Project to Combat Gerrymandering

    November 8: After spending the summer working with students and professors from around the country, three Lewis & Clark students return to campus with new skills and perspectives on how to use mathematics to create a solution to partisan gerrymandering. The six-week program is a collaboration of Tufts University, Harvard University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  • Ray Warren Symposium Tackles Race and Medicine

    October 26: Health is an issue that impacts us all, yet many struggle to receive adequate health care. In hopes of better understanding these inequities, the 15th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies—titled Bitter Pills: Race, Health, and Medicine—focuses on the racialized dimensions of health, highlighting the voices of communities of color. Running November 7 through November 9, the symposium is free and open to the public.
  • Student Research Illuminates Manuscript Mysteries

    December 3: At first glance, chemistry and English have little in common. Yet two courses from these disciplines are now intertwined, thanks to a rare tome acquired in 2014 by Watzek Library’s Special Collections: an illuminated 15th-century book of hours.
  • “Science translator” Katie Kowal wins Rhodes Scholarship

    November 17: Becoming a finalist for the Rhodes and Marshall scholarship requires outstanding academic prowess and character. Katie Kowal BA ’17 interviewed for both scholarships following an endorsement from the college and much support from faculty who believed Kowal was a perfect candidate for these distinguished awards.
  • New Course Examines Intersection of Sustainability and Entrepreneurship

    November 2: As sustainability becomes increasingly relevant in all academic and professional arenas, a new course offered in conjunction with the Bates Center for Entrepreneurship and Leadership gives students of any major an introduction to the challenges of running a sustainable business and the laws and technicalities of sustainability in the business world.
  • A Modern Take on a Horror Classic: Sweeney Todd Opens November 2

    October 18: Sweeney Todd , a collaboration between the music and theatre departments, opens on November 2. Director Rebecca Lingafelter has transformed the traditional setting of Fleet Street into a post-apocalyptic, subterranean world where the audience and student orchestra will sit among the actors. The musical will feature Liam Beveridge BA ’20 as Sweeney in his first-ever singing role.

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