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Most Recent Updates

    • 03/02/2018

      Fay Stetz-Waters JD ’05 was appointed the new Linn County Circuit Court judge by Governor Kate Brown JD ’85 on October 19, 2017. The appointment filled a vacancy created by the retirement of Judge Carol R. Bispham Hashagen until the general election in May, which confirmed Stetz-Waters in the position.

    • 05/18/2018

      John Reitz BS ’48, BM ’49 writes: “I must say that life is good here in Oro Valley, Arizona. I’m still playing in two large jazz bands, which rehearse weekly and play one or two gigs monthly. I also play in a very busy trad-jazz band (The Dixiecats). My Northwest group, the Harbor Patrol Jazz Band, was booked once again for the Clark County Fair for six days in August 2018. This was our 23rd consecutive year at that fair. We must be doing something right. Playing trumpet in creative jazz groups makes life really interesting and enjoyable, and in this 94th year of my life, my health could not be better, walking about a mile daily and doing the gym five times each week. My former wife died last December at age 93, and my present wife of 34 years, Carroll, is a delight. How could life be better for a nonagenarian? My best to you all.”

    • 02/13/2018

      John Reitz BS ’48, BM ’49 writes that he would “be delighted to be there [at Alumni Weekend], joking and toasting my classmates graduating from L&C in June 1948 and June 1949. Unfortunately, I am committed to attend the reunion of the Panther Veteran’s Association in Jacksonville, Florida, at that same time. This veteran’s association is formed from those of us who served (and survived) in the 66th Infantry Division in World War II. Our service was chasing the Germans out of France, across Bavaria and into Austria. It’s a very special group in that last year there were only 16 of us WWII veterans left from the 14,000 who served; however, there were 267 next-generation relatives who made it fantastic. We spawned neat kids. I look back with great admiration to my two and one half years on our beautiful campus.”

    • 06/25/2017

      John Reitz BS ’48, BM ’49, a WWII veteran and one of 15 surviving members of the 66th Infantry Division, attended the group’s annual reunion in Louisville, Kentucky, in summer 2017. Reitz says he’s been attending since the events started in 1969, and he’s only missed one. Reitz worked with radio equipment during the war, and was on deck when the SS  Leopoldville, the ship carrying his division to reinforce soldiers at the Battle of the Bulge, was hit by a German torpedo. Reitz was lucky enough to be able to swim to safety, but 800 service members were lost that day. He says “the traditions and the friendships” are what keep him coming back for reunions.

    • 12/12/2016

      John Reitz BS ’48, BM ’49, who invigorated the Snack Shack that once existed below Albany Quadrangle with jazz music, continues to play trumpet. Reitz, along with his Harbor Patrol Jazz Band, performed at the Clark County Fair in Vancouver, Washington, in August. It was the 20th consecutive year the band had played at the event.

    • 07/17/2018

      Al Larsen JD ’77 is both the general counsel and the head of Congressional and Public Affairs for the Office of Inspector General at the Environmental Protection Agency. He reports that he is working under the ancient curse “May you live in interesting times.” Larsen’s role is to ensure that EPA officials, including political appointees at the top of the organization, conduct their activities and lead the agency within the boundaries of the law. Much of this has recently played out in public and before Congress. Larsen says that the barrage of accusations and counter-narratives is constant and deafening, and his shop has to sort it all out and then act—which it has done repeatedly in recent months.

    • 07/12/2018

      David Rosengard JD ’15, LLM ’16 and his wife, Diana Wiener Rosengard BA ’04, JD ’09, bought their first home in Saint Helens, Oregon, in October 2017. They promptly adopted two adorable rescue pitbulls, who keep them busy. David works at the Animal Legal Defense Fund and teaches as a adjunct professor at Lewis & Clark Law School. Diana works as a senior manager at a global open-source technology company, while writing novels in her spare time.

    • 07/12/2018

      Diana Wiener Rosengard BA ’04, JD ’09 and her husband, David Rosengard JD ’15, LLM ’16, bought their first home in Saint Helens, Oregon, in October 2017. They promptly adopted two adorable rescue pitbulls, who keep them busy. David works at the Animal Legal Defense Fund and teaches as a adjunct professor at Lewis & Clark Law School. Diana works as a senior manager at a global open-source technology company, while writing novels in her spare time. Her first novel, Spooked, a “New Adult supernatural noir,” is coming out in September 2018.

    • 08/01/2018

      Raymond Crutchley JD ’99 was appointed Deschutes County Deputy District Attorney to the county’s circuit court by Oregon Governor Kate Brown JD ’85, filling the vacancy left by Judge Alta Brady’s recent retirement. Crutchley, 49, is the first African American to serve as an Oregon judge east of the Cascades, the governor’s office noted in its announcement. “Ray Crutchley is a person of unbounded talent, energy, and passion, who embodies the very essence of the American dream,” Brown said. “His diverse life experiences and commitment to justice will serve him well on the bench, allowing him to connect with a wide range of litigants who appear in his courtroom.” Born and raised in Jamaica, Crutchley immigrated to New York at age 11 with his mother, according to a brief biography provided by the governor’s office. He joined the military during college, and served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1988 to 1992. Upon his honorable discharge from the Marines, Crutchley returned to school and graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Queens College in 1995. Following law school and a judicial clerkship with Clackamas County Circuit Judge Raymond Bagley Jr., Crutchley practiced in Northeast Portland and Hillsboro for more than a decade, representing underserved clients in criminal defense and civil matters. He has prosecuted criminal cases as a Deschutes County Deputy DA since 2015.

  • Steven Mitchell Carpenter died July 16, 2016, after a short illness. He was 61 years old.

    Steven was born April 8, 1955, in Miles City, Montana. He attended The Dalles High School in Oregon. After receiving a bachelor’s degree in French, he worked as the assistant regional director of public affairs for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Portland. He then earned a JD, following which he worked in private practice, focusing on products liability and professional malpractice defense.

    Steven joined the Professional Liability Fund (PLF) as a claims attorney in 2000. He spoke and wrote widely on lawyer liability issues, but will be most remembered for his compassion for lawyers facing malpractice claims. Throughout his professional career, Steven made many friends and enjoyed working with many wonderful colleagues.

    A former member of the Portland Gay Men’s Chorus, Steven was an avid supporter of all the arts. His passions included cooking, traveling (especially to France), and his Dobermans.

    Steven is survived by his parents, Don and Juanita Carpenter; his brothers, Mike and Lynn Carpenter; nephew Kyle Carpenter, with his wife Jennifer and their son Conley; nephew Cory Carpenter, with his wife Karyn; and numerous aunts, uncles, and cousins, as well as countless friends.

  •  Passed away on August 27, 2016.

    • 07/10/2018

      Angélica Pulido-Westlake BA ’13 has enjoyed a fulfilling career in the nonprofit sector, developing and delivering education programs for organizations like the Native American Youth & Family Center and Adelante Mujeres in the Pacific Northwest. She has also had the great pleasure of marrying her partner of seven years, father to their sweet 2-year-old boy and baby girl expected in June 2018.

  • Patricia Barnard Stipe BA ’50, August 13, 2016, age 89. Patricia worked in the Swan Island shipyards, contributing to the war effort. When the war ended, she married Tom Stipe. After a stint in New York City, the couple returned to Portland, where Patricia opened a children’s clothing store in Lake Oswego. The couple raised three children and lived in Eastmoreland for more than 50 years. Patricia enjoyed playing the piano and was active with the Oregon Symphony, the First Unitarian Church, and the Eastmoreland Garden Club. Survivors include her three children, Bob, Paul, and Anne, as well as three grandchildren.