Art for Social Change

We are a committee on the Lewis & Clark campus composed of faculty, staff, students and alumni from our undergraduate, graduate and law campuses. We believe art in relationship transforms lives, builds community, examines social constructs, raises critical consciousness and creates a more just society.

Art for Social Change Events

May 31

Art for Social Change Bi-Weekly Meeting (Open to L&C Community)

Open to all students, faculty, staff and alumni of L&C, we create events to heal from oppression and discuss where art in relationship transforms lives, builds community, examines social constructs, raises critical consciousness and creates a more just society.
June 14

Art for Social Change Bi-Weekly Meeting (Open to L&C Community)

Open to all students, faculty, staff and alumni of L&C, we create events to heal from oppression and discuss where art in relationship transforms lives, builds community, examines social constructs, raises critical consciousness and creates a more just society.
June 19

Juneteenth 2022

Save the date!

Other Events

May 25

Exquisite Gorge Fiber Arts Project

Come see student fiber artists at work on the Exquisite Gorge project!

A collaborative artwork involving artists and communities throughout the Columbia River Gorge, which will be unveiled to the public at the Maryhill Museum of Art in Goldendale, Washington, on August 6.

 

This semester, students in Studio Art/Art History and Environmental Studies have been working with artist Amanda Triplett to collect climate data from the Columbia Gorge and then interpret and visualize that data to show the impact of climate change within a fiber art installation. The Lewis & Clark community is now welcome to visit the studio where they are working, to learn about the project and different fiber techniques and to see the creative process in action. The studio space is Fields 206 and is open Mondays/Wednesdays, 11:30-2:30.

 

For the initial phase of the project, Triplett and the students used pre-collected data sets from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other sources, and data collected from the river itself. They are now translating specific data sets into individual fiber art pieces to be included in a larger fiber sculpture that depicts a section of the Columbia River Gorge. Specifically, the surface layer of the river and surrounding areas were mapped out and are now being stitched into a horizontal tapestry suspended within a 4’ x 4’ x 6’ frame. Underneath the surface of this main textile tapestry, different types of climate data relating to the river are being depicted as distinct fiber arts sculptural forms. When the entire work is completed, it will then be included as one of a total of ten sections comprising the entire Columbia River Gorge and exhibited at Maryhill at the end of the summer.

May 30

Exquisite Gorge Fiber Arts Project

Come see student fiber artists at work on the Exquisite Gorge project!

A collaborative artwork involving artists and communities throughout the Columbia River Gorge, which will be unveiled to the public at the Maryhill Museum of Art in Goldendale, Washington, on August 6.

 

This semester, students in Studio Art/Art History and Environmental Studies have been working with artist Amanda Triplett to collect climate data from the Columbia Gorge and then interpret and visualize that data to show the impact of climate change within a fiber art installation. The Lewis & Clark community is now welcome to visit the studio where they are working, to learn about the project and different fiber techniques and to see the creative process in action. The studio space is Fields 206 and is open Mondays/Wednesdays, 11:30-2:30.

 

For the initial phase of the project, Triplett and the students used pre-collected data sets from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other sources, and data collected from the river itself. They are now translating specific data sets into individual fiber art pieces to be included in a larger fiber sculpture that depicts a section of the Columbia River Gorge. Specifically, the surface layer of the river and surrounding areas were mapped out and are now being stitched into a horizontal tapestry suspended within a 4’ x 4’ x 6’ frame. Underneath the surface of this main textile tapestry, different types of climate data relating to the river are being depicted as distinct fiber arts sculptural forms. When the entire work is completed, it will then be included as one of a total of ten sections comprising the entire Columbia River Gorge and exhibited at Maryhill at the end of the summer.

May 31

Art for Social Change Bi-Weekly Meeting (Open to L&C Community)

Open to all students, faculty, staff and alumni of L&C, we create events to heal from oppression and discuss where art in relationship transforms lives, builds community, examines social constructs, raises critical consciousness and creates a more just society.
June 1

Exquisite Gorge Fiber Arts Project

Come see student fiber artists at work on the Exquisite Gorge project!

A collaborative artwork involving artists and communities throughout the Columbia River Gorge, which will be unveiled to the public at the Maryhill Museum of Art in Goldendale, Washington, on August 6.

 

This semester, students in Studio Art/Art History and Environmental Studies have been working with artist Amanda Triplett to collect climate data from the Columbia Gorge and then interpret and visualize that data to show the impact of climate change within a fiber art installation. The Lewis & Clark community is now welcome to visit the studio where they are working, to learn about the project and different fiber techniques and to see the creative process in action. The studio space is Fields 206 and is open Mondays/Wednesdays, 11:30-2:30.

 

For the initial phase of the project, Triplett and the students used pre-collected data sets from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other sources, and data collected from the river itself. They are now translating specific data sets into individual fiber art pieces to be included in a larger fiber sculpture that depicts a section of the Columbia River Gorge. Specifically, the surface layer of the river and surrounding areas were mapped out and are now being stitched into a horizontal tapestry suspended within a 4’ x 4’ x 6’ frame. Underneath the surface of this main textile tapestry, different types of climate data relating to the river are being depicted as distinct fiber arts sculptural forms. When the entire work is completed, it will then be included as one of a total of ten sections comprising the entire Columbia River Gorge and exhibited at Maryhill at the end of the summer.

June 6

Exquisite Gorge Fiber Arts Project

Come see student fiber artists at work on the Exquisite Gorge project!

A collaborative artwork involving artists and communities throughout the Columbia River Gorge, which will be unveiled to the public at the Maryhill Museum of Art in Goldendale, Washington, on August 6.

 

This semester, students in Studio Art/Art History and Environmental Studies have been working with artist Amanda Triplett to collect climate data from the Columbia Gorge and then interpret and visualize that data to show the impact of climate change within a fiber art installation. The Lewis & Clark community is now welcome to visit the studio where they are working, to learn about the project and different fiber techniques and to see the creative process in action. The studio space is Fields 206 and is open Mondays/Wednesdays, 11:30-2:30.

 

For the initial phase of the project, Triplett and the students used pre-collected data sets from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other sources, and data collected from the river itself. They are now translating specific data sets into individual fiber art pieces to be included in a larger fiber sculpture that depicts a section of the Columbia River Gorge. Specifically, the surface layer of the river and surrounding areas were mapped out and are now being stitched into a horizontal tapestry suspended within a 4’ x 4’ x 6’ frame. Underneath the surface of this main textile tapestry, different types of climate data relating to the river are being depicted as distinct fiber arts sculptural forms. When the entire work is completed, it will then be included as one of a total of ten sections comprising the entire Columbia River Gorge and exhibited at Maryhill at the end of the summer.

June 8

Exquisite Gorge Fiber Arts Project

Come see student fiber artists at work on the Exquisite Gorge project!

A collaborative artwork involving artists and communities throughout the Columbia River Gorge, which will be unveiled to the public at the Maryhill Museum of Art in Goldendale, Washington, on August 6.

 

This semester, students in Studio Art/Art History and Environmental Studies have been working with artist Amanda Triplett to collect climate data from the Columbia Gorge and then interpret and visualize that data to show the impact of climate change within a fiber art installation. The Lewis & Clark community is now welcome to visit the studio where they are working, to learn about the project and different fiber techniques and to see the creative process in action. The studio space is Fields 206 and is open Mondays/Wednesdays, 11:30-2:30.

 

For the initial phase of the project, Triplett and the students used pre-collected data sets from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other sources, and data collected from the river itself. They are now translating specific data sets into individual fiber art pieces to be included in a larger fiber sculpture that depicts a section of the Columbia River Gorge. Specifically, the surface layer of the river and surrounding areas were mapped out and are now being stitched into a horizontal tapestry suspended within a 4’ x 4’ x 6’ frame. Underneath the surface of this main textile tapestry, different types of climate data relating to the river are being depicted as distinct fiber arts sculptural forms. When the entire work is completed, it will then be included as one of a total of ten sections comprising the entire Columbia River Gorge and exhibited at Maryhill at the end of the summer.

Galleries

Climate Change Theatre Action

Art for Social Change participated in the 2021 Climate Change Theatre Action on November 13, 2021 at Bag&Baggage’s Vault Theatre in Hillsboro. Other participants included 350PDX Washington Team and the Westside Quilters Guild.

Joy & Justice Community Fair

Art for Social Change set up a table at the 2021 Ray Warren Ethnic Studies Symposium’s Community Fair.

Quilt Square Samples

Some quilting square samples from Art for Social Change Commitee’s Quilt for Change project.

Quilting For Change - 9/1/2021

Quilting For Change event on September 1, 2021

Quilting For Change

Our first Quilt for Change event happened on August 6, 2021 in a tent by York at the Graduate School at Lewis & Clark College.

How to Make a Quilt Square

Don’t know how to make a quilt square? Read our Zine!

Chalk for Juneteenth

The Juneteenth Chalk Celebration was presented in partnership with the Bag&Baggage Productions, the Hillsboro Downtown Partnership and AgeCelebration.

MayDay Chalk for Justice

LC Art for Social Change members Mary Andrus, Liv Siulagi, Lawrence Siulagi and Beth Ann Short draw with colored chalk at Shemanski Park in downtown Portland, Oregon on May 1, 2021.

BLM Art Event at The Armory on 4/7/21

A gallery of photos from the BLM Art Event at The Armory in Portland, Oregon on April 7, 2021.

BLM Art Event at The Armory on 11/11/20

November 11, 2020 BLM Art Therapy Event at The Armory.

Hostile Terrain Event

Filling out toe tags for Hostile Terrain 94 art display in conjunction with the Ray Warren Symposium.

BLM Art Event at The Armory on 9/23/20

BLM Art Therapy Event at Irving Park on September 23, 2020.