Agnes Flanagan Chapel

Agnes Flanagan Building

The Agnes Flanagan Chapel is one of the first buildings that visitors to Lewis & Clark College see as they drive up Palatine Hill Road and approach the main campus. The chapel is named in honor and memory of college trustee Agnes Flanagan whose vision, enthusiasm and generosity made its construction possible. Completed in the fall of 1968, the chapel was officially dedicated in February of 1969.

The chapel’s impressive contemporary lines and distinctive conical shape incorporate a strong Northwest Coast Native American influence, and are the design of architect Paul Thiry. The Wallace Howe Lee Memorial Bridge, leading from the roadway to the chapel entrance, is flanked by sculpted figures of the four evangelists (Matthew, Mark, Luke and John). Chief Lelooska of the Cherokee tribe designed these figures which combine ancient Christian symbolism with the symbolism of the Northwest Coast Native American people.

Chapel Skyline with Trees and Blue Sky

Chapel Interior The beautiful interior of the chapel features a magnificent Casavant organ, seating for 460 people, and stained glass windows which depict the creation story as told in the book of Genesis. The Casavant organ has 85 ranks and most of the almost 5,000 pipes are suspended in the center of the chapel from the pinnacle of the chapel ceiling. The stained glass windows were designed and crafted by Gabriel Loire of Chartres, France, an artist renowned for his work worldwide.

Agnes Flanagan Chapel is used regularly for worship services, lectures, concerts, musical performances, and for other events. The Office of Spiritual Life and the Ombuds Office are located on the lower level. If you wish to obtain information about reserving the chapel for an event or a wedding, please contact the Lewis & Clark Conferences and Events Office (email: events@lclark.edu; phone: 503-768-7235 or 503-768-7109).

Chapel in the Snow Chapel and Pavilion in Spring

This summer, Lewis & Clark began construciton of thenew Diane Gregg Memorial Pavilion and the...